Nepotism

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Nepotism

Nepotism is favoritism shown by somebody in power to relatives and friends, especially in appointing them to good positions. The chief complaint in a company that operates through nepotism is the patent lack of fairness. It is perceived as favoritism of a relative that can cause dissatisfaction among workers and lower morale. Employees seem to have less incentive to perform their responsibilities diligently and proficiently if they feel that the path to promotion is undermined by nepotism. Very few laws regulate nepotism at either the state or federal level. Some consequences of nepotism may increase your risk of being sued for discrimination or hostile work environment (hrhero 2009). Nepotism usually leads to an inferior work product. The employees who are majority of the time rewarded and promoted because of their relationships with management are likely to be under qualified for the positions they are expected to fill. They do not perform as well as those who deserve the position. That could cause an attrition of leadership skills at the senior level of the corporation and also contribute to the demoralization of more deserving candidates.

Nepotism can take place in politics where a person with a political position either passes on their position or gets employment for a member of their family. Another type of nepotism that occurs is within the educational system, when a family member is admitted on the basis of their family’s history at the school applied to. A business could be sometimes suspected of nepotism when certain family members of higher-ups are promoted, hired, or given raises while other employees remain in their own positions. When an employee is fired and a family member of business leaders takes the position, it could be considered nepotism. Some businesses have serious rules about banning nepotism, which includes not having spouses or family members working in the same department or company. Nepotism may be extremely taxing for people who meet at work and go on to get married. On the discretion of the company the couple will have to change departments, or if in the service someone in the relationship will have to leave the service or be transferred to another location.

Some businesses and organizations provide polices, and handbooks on nepotism. Laws regarding political nepotism vary from state to state (criminal lawyer2009). Several colleges and universities have a policy on nepotism as well. Along with the policies they enacted, they have procedures for people to follow. When you are applying for jobs, or upon receiving a job you have to notify the supervisors if you have a relative or spouse that works in the organization also. For example, the County of Santa Barbara retains the right to refuse to appoint a person to a position in the same department, division or facility, in which his or her relationship to another employee has the potential for creating adverse impact on supervision, safety, security or morale, or involves a potential conflict of interest. Their policy applies to all individuals in a relationship, from marriages to step parents, and children. Santa Barbara does not discriminate in its employment and personnel actions with respect to its employees and applicants on the basis of marital or familial status It also, applies to those of an immediate family to extended members. Their procedure is that the relatives have to be separated. They have to notify their head supervisors, and it is up to them to give one of them a different position.

Some policies prohibit the hiring of an employee's relatives under any circumstances, while others only prohibit it if there would be a direct or indirect reporting relationship between the two related individuals. Some private sectors and public sectors have a policy. Both private and public will have you sign an agreement or have you go through training, and the in the training...
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