Nelson Mandela and the South African Apartheid

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Marlon Burnett
April 4, 2012
AAS 170

Nelson Mandela and the South African Apartheid
Nelson Mandela is one of the most influential people in African history. South Africa was colonized by the English and the Dutch in the seventeenth century. The domination by the English resulted in the Dutch establishing new colonies. The two colonies were called Orange Free State and Transvaal. Soon after the Dutch discovered that the land had an abundance of diamonds. Once the English found out, they invaded the colonies which sparked the beginning of the Boer War. After the war ended and the Dutch gained independence, the National Afrikaner Party gained power. From there, the National Party came up with the apartheid. The apartheid was intended to cement their control over the economic and social system. It was also intended to keep white domination while extending racial separation.

Even though it was a violation of international law, the South African government passed laws that created “grand apartheid”. The first apartheid laws were passed in 1948. These race laws touched every aspect of social life. The laws included, no marriage between non- whites and whites and they even sanctioned white only jobs. In 1951, a law was passed making it a criminal offence for a black person to work in any urban areas. The ratio of earnings for blacks and whites was one to 14. In 1950, the Population Registration Act required that South Africa be racially classified into three categories: white, black, and colored (mixed decent). In 1951, The Bantu Authorities Act required that blacks were assigned to homelands. All their rights were restricted to each specific homeland, even voting. In 1951, the Separation Representation of Voters Act led to the removal of colored from the common voter’s poll. They were no longer citizens of South Africa. From 1976 to 1981, four homelands were made, denationalizing nine million South Africans. Africans living in homelands needed passports to...
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