Neglegence in Foster Care

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Introduction
Problem Statement: Foster care children are assigned to homes or residential care and kinship. On occasion some without a comprehensive background check of the child or the prospective families, other than the classes for foster parenting licensing which is generally having one or two home checks. These quick placement fixes can lead to negligence within the placement on these children. This is a problem because far too many of these children in foster care have physical, mental health and behavioral problems, according to: Child Protection and Child: Measuring the Effects of Foster Care by Joseph J Doyle, Jr. in “Chicago the most common report of abuse is the family itself 29%. School personnel 13%, police 13% and physicians 12% are known as new mandated reports -they are required by law to report suspected abuse or neglect. The average age of all first investigated children in Illinois is 6.5, with half of the children under the age of five.” “The 1997 survey of inmates in Adult State and Federal Correctional Facilities shows that nearly 20% of inmates under the age of 30, and 25% of these inmates with prior convictions, reported spending time in foster care as a child (authors’ calculations).” Research Question: How can we improve the lives of children in foster care and help eliminate some of the negligence where placement is concerned? Sub-Question: Has the parents’ drug use, abuse or biological issues caused the children to have neurologic abnormalities which might have contributed to placement issues? Children who are placed in foster care face the potential for neglect because far too many potential placement homes are not being thoroughly investigated prior to children being placed in their care. The importance of the negligent problem can't be emphasized enough. Extremely too many foster care children are being missed treatment as well as overmedicated in foster care. This heavy toll is not only costing the child it is also negatively affecting the society in which we all live in. Negligence within foster care placement has had a disproportionately detrimental influence on the children who have been retained in foster care. In 1982 there were 252,000 children in care. In 1996 507,000 children were apart of foster care, and 725,000 children were serviced by the foster care system at some time during that year (Tatara, 1998). In 1996, approximately three fourth of the children in foster care were placed with foster families (Adoption and Foster Care Analysis and Reporting System, 1997, 08-C), and the remainder being in other types of care, such as residential or group homes. As of September 30, 2010 there were 480, 425 young people in foster care. Far too many children have experienced sexual abuse, physical abuse and emotional abuse. Many children in foster care have significant behavioral and emotional problems (e.g., Heflinger, Simpkins, & Combs- Orme, 2000; Pilowsky, 1995), and many of them are at risk for developing additional problems because of a history of child abuse and neglect, family problems, or parental mental health problems. What helps to connect all the above are events and environments experienced in childhood? This can have effects on development, behavior, health, mental health, and other functional outcomes into adulthood (Koenen & Widom, 2009; Van der Kolk, Roth, Pecovitz, Sunday, & Spinazzola 2005). Within this paper, I will try to explain and define the major problem within the foster care system as far as child placement is concerned. From all indications it appears that social workers are overburdened with heavy client loads which make it almost impossible to keep up with their client’s regularly. The harm that is caused to foster care children from the time they are placed, to the time they may possibly be put in a hospital or criminal juvenile facility can be substantial. Foster care children are in a vulnerable...
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