Negative Disruptions

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Running Head: NEGATIVE

Negative Disruption
Tina Murray
Grand Canyon University: EDU 536

Classroom management is best when students are following procedures and doing what is expect of them. Disruptions and misbehaviors are under control. The ideal classroom where students behave the way they are expected to. Classrooms like this are only found in heaven where perfection is the mainstream of life.

Classroom disruptions happen in almost every classroom. Let’s be honest, it happens in every classroom not almost every classroom. Educators deal with students who have their own mind and want to control as much as they can. The frustrations of teachers with classroom management are caused by the negative classroom conditions or disruptions made by students. For the purposes of this investigation the following negative disruptions will be discussed in detail, talking without permission, disruptive noises, texting or computer usage, tardiness, sleeping in class, unpreparedness, insults, physical threats, and passing notes.

One of the major classroom disruptions is talking during lecture, or shouting out comments without raising hands for permission. A student who talks either to other classmates or blurts out during lessons is rude and leads to more serious disruptive behavior (Linsin, 2009). A teacher allows her students to freely discuss the topic of discussion during class. Students are actively shouting out answers and the noise level gets high. To anyone looking in on this class from the outside it seems that the class is out of control. To the teacher it is a chaos she can manage. She loves it when her students interact in this way, but as the year has went on this type of activity has gotten out of hand. Students are behaving with free discussion most of the time and the teacher is having a hard time bring them back into a quiet, productive learning environment that all students can benefit from. This classroom is lacking in structure and procedures in how the class should run from the beginning. It is not wrong to have days where free discussion happens, but students need to be taught the procedures when this can take place. The best way to handle talking out of turn is to enforce a consequence every time this procedure is disregarded (Linsin, 2009). Teachers have to be consistent in enforcing the rules so they are never seen as a teacher who favors one student over another.

Disruptive noises within classrooms are going to happen. A student starts tapping his pencil, another starts clicking their mouth, and still another starts humming. All of these noises maybe innocent not intentionally trying to disrupt the learning environment, but noises may cause learning to stop or become difficult for some students. Some students will disrupt the class with disruptive noises to get the teacher off tract. No matter how the noises happen the learning in the room is being compromised. Not all noises come from the students there are outside noises that may disrupt the learning environment. How do teachers handle these interruptions to their learning environments? Harry Wong states that establishing classroom rules and expectations will address most of the disruptions from students (Charles, 2011). Procedures around the noises from outside forces can be address by teaching students proper responses to noise interference from outside the classroom (Charles, 2011).

Teaching in the private sector has its advantages. Classes are typically small which can be a plus because teachers can address more issues one on one. One thing that is a frustration is students not being on time or are unprepared for class which is more noticed in a smaller class. Tardiness and unpreparedness has been a constant disruption to classroom learning for eons. Unpreparedness ranges from not having the proper materials such as a pencil, paper, or book to not having read or done the homework. Procedures taught at the...
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