Native American Healing and Dance

Page 1 of 5

Native American Healing and Dance

By | October 1999
Page 1 of 5
Native American Dance and Healing

Native Americans in Contemporary Society:

The population in the United States has increased steadily in the 20th century. In

1990 the number of Native Americans was almost two million, 8 percent of the total

population. Slightly more than one third live on a reservation; about half live in urban

areas. Indian reservations function as independent governments within the federal

framework.

Among many of the Native Americans, there are many musical styles, singing is the

dominant form of musical expression, with instrumental music serving primarily as

rhythmic accompaniment. Throughout the Americas the principal instruments have been

drums, flutes, and whistles.

The American Indian lived life in love with nature. Their wisdom showed in

everything, their capacity for harmony with the environment, what they wore, what they

created, what they ate and how it was prepared, in their philosophies and beliefs.

Music and dance were confined to the native world or offered in tourist attractions

as an illustration of a lifestyle unknown to many people. Over the past few years there has

been a heightened interest in all Indian things, such as in their art. Expression in the art

and dance among North American people this part of life in the form of function and

ceremony as it is decoration or performance. Today the Indian Arts have been

"discovered", and a large cross section of humanity is enjoying its intrinsic excellence,

vitality, originality and tradition they offer to the heart and head.

Men's Traditional Dance:

They danced with exaggerated movement above the waist to simulate hunting,

tracking, or fighting, but heavy grounded, flat footed loser body. This dance originated

with members of warrior societies on the Great Plains. Costumes includes an eagle feather

bustle and hair roach made of porcupine quills.

Women's Traditional Dance:

This dance is...