Native American

Topics: Native Americans in the United States, Indian reservation, American Indian Movement Pages: 5 (1900 words) Published: February 19, 2014
1. Describe the Indian Reorganization Act of 1934 - How does this act signify a new approach for the US government in terms of Native Americans, and in what ways does this reflect other policies and outlooks of America during that time period? Clare - Progress is not always beneficial (think about nuclear bomb in WW1.5). This act, created under John Collier who was the director of the Buraeu of Indian Affairs and was sympathetic towards the preservation of native culture and Roosevelt.It was seen as a complete reversal of the Dawes Act. is often called the “Indian New Deal” and was intended to allow Indians to keep their land or buy their land back (with help). The act restored tribal sovereignty. Encouraged preservation of language, religion and culture. It reflected changing attitudes towards progress in lieu of the Depression. People were much more tolerant and supportive of equal rights given to Natives in comparison with the prejudices of the Jacksonian 19th century and earlier.The Indian Reorganization Act was just after the Citizen Act of 1924 - all natives were given citizenship. It is ironic that they got citizenship and then were given back their identity rights 10 years later. Tribes were already fragmented, their children removed to far-away boarding schools, and the land that had not been apportioned out into individual plots for tribe members had been given away to non-Natives. Indian Reorganization Act was however important in that it represented an albeit feeble attempt at restitution, and a small step in the right direction

Emily - complete 180 degree reversal from the Dawes act that preceded it. This act was done by Collier who was the director of the Buraeu of Indian Affairs and was sympathetic towards the preservation of native culture. The act provided funds for the requisition of native lands as well as money to help native Americans to be successful and independent. Encouraged preservation of language, religion and culture. Also called the Indian New Deal and it reflected changing attitudes towards progress in lieu of the Depression. Pims - The Indian Reorganization Act of 1934 signified a new approach by the US government in terms of dealing with Native Americans rights. The act restored tribal sovereignty and gave Native Americans basic rights that they lacked before. It was seen as a complete reversal of the Dawes Act. In addition, this change in policy reflects a change in the overall zeitgeist of American society in regards to Native Americans. People were much more tolerant and supportive of equal rights given to Natives in comparison with the prejudices of the Jacksonian 19th century and earlier. Max - while the IRA tried to reverse the harm done by the Dawes Act of 1887, it was pretty ineffective, because by the time it came it was - as our efforts to ameliorate the Native condition so often are - too little and too late. Tribes were already fragmented, their children removed to far-away boarding schools, and the land that had not been apportioned out into individual plots for tribe members had been given away to non-Natives. It was however important in that it represented an albeit feeble attempt at restitution, and a small step in the right direction

2. Describe the American Indian Movement - what were its relations to the Termination Policy? The Civil Rights Movement? Who supported AIM, and who did not? What were the goals of AIM? How did they try to accomplish these, and how successful were they? Clare - This took place during the civil rights movement which was focused on African Americans but other ethnic groups stemmed off it.~1953-1968 Termination policy - ~1890s Assimilation -Indian children were taken from their parents off the reservation and put into boarding schools where they would learn English, forget their native language and learn different forms of Christianity. When the children were old enough, they would be dumped in urban cities where they were farther away from...
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