Narrative Report

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OJT’s can bring fresh ideas into the organization. Given the opportunity tospeak their minds freely and without fear, they maybe able to contributesignificantly in brainstorming sessions or research and eventually help improvethe organizations productivity. While training the interns, employers are in factalso teaching their employees to process of guiding the trainees stretches their patience, develops teaching skills and makes them more sensitive to the needsand mind set of the younger generation. The course of supervision also teachesthem how to share what they know and be receptive to questions. Hence, theinternship also becomes an avenue in training for future managers of thecompany.Accommodating on-the-job trainees can truly be beneficial not only to thetrainees but also to the companies that provide opportunities for this type of learning. There is wisdom in the front lines. Such training can be an investmentthat will be valuable to the company later on. This is also why trainees shouldtake their internship seriously as it can become a powerful tool and possibly evena source of recommendation when they take that big lift from being students tocareer professionals. 2

 
CHAPTER IPERSONAL PROFILE
This chapter presents the personal data of the student-trainee highlightingthe college of her origin, as well as her field of specialization. BATANGAS STATE UNIVERSITY
The Batangas State University has an enduring and eventful history of service to the people particularly to the youth in the province of Batangas. TheBSU traces its history from 1903 when it was established as a manual trainingengaged in tracing the youth for gainful occupation particularly in woodworking.The American educators at that time so the need to trainmen as builders andcarpenters to help develop towns and business centers.In 1905, the manual training school was recognizes. It was namedBatangas Trade School and was transferred to its present site. Its emphasis wason wood arts and building construction courses. Later, the course in machineshop was introduced,The Batangas Trade School was renamed Pablo Borbon Memorial TradeSchool in honor of Honorable Pablo Borbon, a Batangueno who held position inthree branches of government, namely as governor, member of Philippine 3

 
Senate and Judge of the court of the first instance. He contributed much for thecause of vocational education in the province.During World War II, the school was temporarily closed. It was reopenedon September 10, 1945. The presence of many American Army surplus jeeps(the American Army was based in Batangas City for 2 years) prompted theopening of another vocational course, auto mechanics. The school became co-educational in the school year 1948 to 1949 with offering of girl’s trade course-food trades, cosmetology and handicraft. Enrollment gradually increasedreaching its peak in school year 1951 to 1952 when construction in the CaltexRefinery in Bauan, a nearby town, was started.By virtue of RA 741, the PBMIT became a national school supported byfunds from the national government for its operation and maintenance. At thisperiod, industrial electricity and forging were offered in addition to existingcourses in response to the need for more electricians and welders brought aboutby the establishment of several big industrial plants in the area.On July 1, 1957 RA 4769 converted the institution into a school of Arts andTrades and was named Pablo Borbon Memorial Regional School of Arts andTrades. For the first, time the school offered the technical education curriculum.Co-courses in radio mechanics and electronics were introduced. The ensuingyears saw the unprecedented increase in the number of building constructed-modernistic structures with spacious rooms for the radio mechanics, electricity,trade drawing, forging, building construction, and machine shop classes. 4

 
This rapid growth includes the organization classes, which were offeredfor the first time in 1963....
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