Narcotic Drugs

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Narcotic drugs

CRJ 311

December 13, 2010

Introduction:
In this paper I will discuss the details the classification of narcotic drugs in criminal law, forensic evidence needed to obtain a conviction in a drug case.
The term narcotic implies a state of lethargy or sluggishness. Pharmacologists classify narcotic drugs as substance that bring relief from pain and produce sleep. Unfortunately narcotic has come to be popularly associated with any drugs that is socially unacceptable, as a consequence of this incorrect usage many drug are improperly call narcotics. Most drug laws in the United States incorrectly designated marijuana as a narcotic; even now many drug controlled laws in the United States including federal law, classify cocaine as a narcotic drug (Saferstein 2011, p193).

A large number of drug users are in daily contact with a range of criminal justice organizations. The police enforce laws relating to illegal drugs and unlawful activities that surround drug use. It is important to recognize that relationship between drug and crime are unclear. Drug use leads to crime; second crimes leads to drug use and third drugs and crime are related to social force (Hughes, p, 75, 2006).

When a forensic chemist picks up a drug specimen for analysis, he or she can expect to find just about anything, so all contingencies must be prepared for. The analysis must leave no room for error because its results will have a direct bearing on the process of determine the guilt or innocence of a defendant. There is no middle ground in drug identification either the specimen is a specific drug or its not and once a positive conclusion is drawn, the chemist must prepared to support and define the validity of the results in the court of law...
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