My View: Evolution

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My View on Evolution
The creation versus evolution debate is a recurring cultural, political, and theological dispute. As a result, Americans have spent a great deal of time in debate about the origins of the Earth, humanity, life, and the universe. Personally, I believe the world is billions of years old, and that all life on earth evolved. I will attempt to provide concrete facts, logical arguments, and solid evidence supporting my view on evolution. With that said, I will also share my personal intuitions and feelings that have led me to believe in evolution. Lastly, I will make a closing argument as to why you should support evolution as well based on the information presented in my paper. Logically, evolution makes sense to me for many reasons. On the other hand, creationists generally use the Bible as their main doctrine in backing up their argument for creation. However, I believe the Bible, alone, is not enough. With any legitimate argument, multiple sources of evidence are always needed. While I could list a dozen things that serve as real-life evidence that evolution is true, I will narrow them down to just two. The first piece of evidence that supports the idea of evolution is genetics. The DNA in our cells reflects each individual’s unique identity and how closely related we are to one another. The same can be said for relationships among organisms. DNA is the molecule that makes up an organism’s genome in the nucleus of every cell. It consists of genes, which are the molecular codes for proteins and the building blocks of our tissues and their functions. Furthermore, DNA shapes how an organism grows up and the physiology of its blood, bone, and brains (Lunine, 163). Thus, DNA is especially important to the study of evolution. Again, DNA tells us how closely or distantly related we are. With that in mind, think about this. The genetic difference between individual humans is minuscule, at about 0.1%, on average. Compared to human studies, a...
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