My Past, Present, and Future Life

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My Past, Present, and Future Life

Frank W. Szakacs

PSY 202

Professor Jason Pieratt

March 18, 2012

My Past, Present, and Future Life (Outline)

I. What was your family like?
a. Military Family
b. Oldest of two boys
c. Parents divorced, living with my father
II. What were you like as a teenager?
a. Sports that I played
b. Attending two different high schools
c. Cultural shock moving from Georgia to California
III. What did you do after you left school?
a. Joining the military
b. Living overseas
c. Going off to war
IV. What jobs have you had in your life?
a. Life after the military
b. Being laid off
c. Challenges for my family
V. What would make you happy in the future?
a. Doing what I love
b. What is my philosophy

My Past, Present, and Future Life

This paper will be a reflection of my first forty-three years of life and my expectations for my next forty-three years. I will start at the beginning and what my upbringing was like with a Marine Corps father then take you through my adolescence years, then through my young adulthood to the present. Lastly, I will give you my insights of what I dream my future will hold and how I plan to get there. I grew up in the Marine Corps, which is to say that my father treated his family as if we were in the Corps. Being the older of two boys, I took the brunt of the expectations that my father had set for my brother Michael and I. We had to be the best at whatever we had committed to doing, it was a little like Ricky Bobbie’s father in the movie Talladega Nights, “if you ain’t first, your last”. Of course, as my brother and I discovered, as we got older, that there is a second, third and even a fourth place in life. When I was 12 years old, my mother had decided that she ‘d had enough and she left the family. My father was not going to allow her to take his boys, so Michael and I stayed with our father. My father was very angry about her decision to leave. They had been together since high school and were married once he had returned from Vietnam. When my mother left he had to assume both roles as father and mother, and was by no means capable of filling my mother’s role of caretaker to our family. Our text tells us that Levinson (1996) says “women are more interested in finding ways to combine work and family, while men see themselves in terms of their career.” (Witt & Mossler, 2010, p. 31) The following three years were very difficult for me. I now had to become the person that looked out for my brother, while trying to keep my father happy so

we would not be punished for the smallest things that we may have done wrong in his eyes. I started playing sports at the age of six and had become a pretty good football player. I started on the high school varsity team as a freshman at Norcross High School in Georgia. In 1984, when I turned 15, we had to move to Huntington Beach, California. I really hated my father for making me leave my girlfriend, Jill, and all of my friends now that I was a teenager. Changing schools was going to be hard enough, but moving from the conservative South to a more liberal state like California was a complete cultural shock. At the time, I had a very thick southern accent, which was great with the girls, but not so much with the boys. At first, I had trouble fitting in, and had to defend and prove myself more than once. After I had proven that I was a pretty good athlete, it was much easier to be accepted into their circles. It also didn’t hurt that in my junior year, I helped the football team win the state championship in football. After high school, I played one-year junior collage football at Goldenwest College in Orange County, California. Before my second year of college, I transferred to Central Connecticut State...
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