My Mother Never Worked

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Purpose and Audience
1. What point is the writer trying to make? Why do you suppose her thesis is never explicitly stated? The author’s whole (main) point of in the essay is to make the reader feel sympathy for her mother, because of the hardships she went through working on a farm while raising eight children, which leads us to believe she is deserving of the Social Security benefit check. Another point is general; even though, women does do so much work towards their home, they don't get any credit from our society. I suppose that…

(When doing this type of writing do not use words like: whole, all, everyone, everybody, always, etc. The Social Security rules (in the U.S.) were originally set up as a pension for people who earned pay and paid into the system. There is no indication in the text that woman who work at home do not recieve credit from society.) 2. This essay appeared in Ms. magazine and other publications whose audiences are sympathetic to feminist goals. Could it just as easily have appeared in a magazine whose audience was not? Explain. I think it could easily appear in a magazine whose audience was not sympathetic to feminist goals. I would say it would not be the most readable topic, and it is probably would have a lot of argumentations and critics after all. (This is a story of rural life in the early 20th Century. This essay could have been written about a man - it is more about how people lived in difficult times. Consider a man who worked hard all of his life during the same times and when he became disabled he would have received the same answer from the Social Security office.) 3. Smith-Yackel mentions relatively little about her father in this essay. How can you account for this? She does this because she is disappointed to hear that her mother never worked by the person on the phone. The author tried to show as many details about her mother`s work as possible; Smith-Yackel gains empathy throughout the essay for her mother by...
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