My Father Goes to Court by Carlos Bulosan

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My Father Goes to Court by Carlos Bulosan

By | September 2013
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Summary:
The story is set in a city in the Philippines. The young narrator begins by describing his large family. Though they are poor they are full of mischief and laughter. The children are all strong and healthy even though they often go hungry. In contrast, their rich neighbor’s children are thin and sickly although they are given plenty of good food, which their impoverished neighbors enjoy smelling over the fence. Consequently, the rich man brings a charge against the narrator's family for stealing the spirit of his family’s food. The absurd case goes to court, and the narrator’s father agrees to pay back the rich neighbor. He does this by collecting coins from all his friends present in his hat, then shaking the hat full of coins. Being charged to pay for the spirit of food which his family supposedly got from its smell, he maintains that the jingling of the coins is a fair equivalent. The judge rules in the poor father’s favor, and the rich man is forced to depart with no other payment than the “spirit” of the money the poor man collected.

I. Plot
    · Incentive Movement
    - The young narrator begins by describing his large family

    · Rising Action
    - Complaint of the rich man to the father in terms with the spirit and wealthy food causing for his family became thin and sick.     
    · Conflict
    - In this story, the rich family and poor family having a conflict in each other.      
    · Climax
    - The tension in this story is when 
    · Falling Action
    - It is accurate to the story because the father give also the questions that given by the lawyer of the rich man and then next is on how the poor man will pay for that.

  II. Characters
  (The young narrator, Father, wife and his children, Rich man with his children’s, servants, policeman, judge and the lawyer.)     - The character seems real and depth in emotions and they are recognizable in their stereotypes. And their motives were understandable that we can relate...

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