Mussolini vs. Hitler

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 427
  • Published : February 1, 2011
Open Document
Text Preview
Mussolini vs. Hitler
The rise of fascism in Italy was fueled by the bitter disappointed of the people over the failure to win large territorial gains at the 1919 Paris Peace Conference. To more and more Italians, their current government, which was democratic at the time, seemed to be doing little to nothing to help the country’s problems, which included rising inflation and unemployment. In Germany, America stopped loans in 1924 and the German economy collapsed. Not knowing what to do, Germans turned to Hitler, a member of the Nazi party, in hopes of a firm leadership and security.

Benito Mussolini was a newspaper editor and a politician who had bold promises to rescue Italy by renewing its economy and reshaping its armed forces. He promised to be a strong leader to Italy and founded the Fascist Party in 1919. On October 1922, 30,000 Fascists marched on the streets of Rome demanding the king to put Mussolini in charge of the government. Having decided that Mussolini was the best hope, Mussolini took power legally, after widespread violence and a threatened uprising.

Adolf Hitler was a little-known political leader at the time when Mussolini became Italy’s dictator. Hitler became the leader of the Nazi party shortly after joining it, which had its own brand of fascism called Nazism. Hitler was arrested for attempting to seize power in Munich in 1923 and in jail wrote a book, Mein Kampf, which set forth his beliefs and his goals for Germany. He states that Germans are of a “master race” and that all other races were inferior. He also says that Germans need more living room vowed to obtain this much needed space by conquering eastern Europe and Russia. By 1932, the Nazis have become the largest political party. Mistakenly, Germany’s leaders thought they could control Hitler and use him for their purposes. In January of 1933 they advised then president Paul von Hindenburg to name Hitler chancellor. Erich Ludendorff acknowledged this bad decision...
tracking img