Music Sharing

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Jan Paredes

Professor Park

English 101-C

6 March 2013

Clone Music
Most people in society have an idea of what file sharing is, but they’re not exactly sure why it’s such a big deal. Some may even be aware of the fact that file sharing is punishable by law and carries a fine of up to and including $20,000. Since the introduction of Napster, a popular online music service in 1999, copyrighted music has been illegally duplicated exponentially. In recent weeks, the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) has filed more than three hundred lawsuits against American consumers who illegally downloaded copyrighted music. File sharing has long been a problem for the recording industry, which has only begun an uphill battle to reduce illegal file sharing. In addition to the lawsuits, the RIAA has employed the use of specialized computer applications in its quest to seek out and hold accountable file sharing users. Slowly, but surely millions of file sharing people are not happy with the RIAA’s recent attacking and have made the resolve to retain their rights. If you have purchased your favorite music album recently, or even a software for your computer, you might regret how much you paid for it later. If you have downloaded a file using a P2P program, it gets pretty addicting. You don't have to drive to the store; just press a few buttons and then you get what you want in a zap. Sometimes in the stores, they don't even have what you want. If you were to find rare music files like the remix of Overture, bootlegs of Nirvana, or promos (promotion music) from DJ's, you could get it in the P2P networks. If you like other foreign music, like Korean pop music, you would also have good chances looking for it because peers all around the world is sharing and downloading. Downloading files is free, but many people are confused that it would be stealing. The RIAA had announced that it is stealing, but people won’t stop. Peers know that P2P programs still exist...
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