Museum Critique

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  • Topic: Sculpture, NorthPark Center, Raymond Nasher
  • Pages : 3 (1160 words )
  • Download(s) : 278
  • Published : April 12, 2008
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Museum Art Critique
If you live in Dallas, most likely you have been to Northpark Mall. However, did you ever notice that Northpark is also a museum? Sort of. Most art people do not know about it, and the shoppers do not seem to care, but the place is owned by Ray Nasher of Nasher Sculpture Center, and he has placed an impressive percentage of his collection in front of Neiman’s, Barney’s, Victoria’s Secret, and the Watch Hut. For the sole purpose and interest in the art presented throughout the mall, I chose to visit Nasher Sculpture Center located in the Dallas Art District. After I reach my destination in Downtown, I park my car and drop coins in the parking meter. As I am walking towards the museum, I go over my reading assignment and power point lecture for the Art Critiquing Process in my head, to mentally prepare myself. As I enter and walk to the admission desk, to my surprise, North Lake College students are free of charge. The assistants hands me a map, I look over it and prepare for my journey. Following the map the first Gallery was the Woman: The Art of Gaston Lachaise. There is where I found my first choice of art, The Tragedy of Life by Boleslaw Biegas, a bronze sculpture made in 1910 in Paris. It is only upon approaching the figure for a closer view that the horrific details of the hands, face, and hair become fully noticeable. The long stream of hair streaks across the forehead, shoulders, and back. The figure's eyes are closed, limiting contact with the surrounding, an insight that is trapped in misery. The hands are held tightly across the cheek and mouths, and two long, bony fingers, press intensely into the eye sockets, illustrating a sign of suffering, a transfixing theme that is anything but naturally calm in nature. From a distance, what strike a viewer of this work are the simplicity, purity and evenhanded profile. The pose is stiffly upright and alert. The elbows are drawn together in front of the chest. Looking at the figure, from...
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