Museum Collection Hum 205

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Axia College University of Phoenix
Jaynelle Nixon
January 27, 2008

Museum Collection 2

Classical and Hellenistic Greece

One of the most well known piece of this time, is the statue called Ludovisi Gaul killing himself and his wife, also known as The Galatian Suicide. The original was made by Greek sculptors commissioned by Attalus I after his victories over the Gauls of Galatia. This is a statue of A man about to drive a dagger into his chest all while holding a dying woman (his wife) and looking over his shoulder, defiantly. The original statue was never recovered, however there were many copies commissioned through out different eras and rulers; they were an expression of sentiment. With the use of strong details, bushy hair, and mustaches this statue was made with the style of the time, realism and vivid movement. The violence of the movements is very lifelike, which creates a realalistic look that employs emotion from the viewer. This is a statue from the period where sculpture style was called Pergamene Baroque. The artist imitated the preceding centuries by portraying painful moments made expressive with three-dimensional compositions, often V-shaped with anatomical realism. With there being so many copies of the original Ludovisi Gaul killing himself commissioned thru the different periods, styles, and materials the best copy is said to be in the Massimo alle Terme museum of Rome.

Museum Collection 3

Etruscan civilization, Republican Rome, and Roman Empire

One of the most recognizable structure in ancient Roman history is the Pantheon, it is a building in Rome which was originally built to serve as a temple to "all the gods" of Ancient Rome. It is one of the best preserved of all Roman buildings, and possibly the best preserved building in its age class in the world. It has been continually used throughout history. The original Pantheon was constructed by Agrippa in 27 B.C., but the original was destroyed in 80 AD. The Pantheon was rebuilt and the current building dates from about 125 A.D. It was reconstructed during the reign of the Emperor Hadrian. It was totally rebuilt including the text of the original inscription which stated, "Marcus Agrippa, son of Lucius, consul for the third time, built it”. The building was repaired by Septimius Severus and Caracalla in 202 AD, then during the Medieval times, in 609 A.D. the Byzantine emperor Phocas gave the building to Pope Boniface IV, who in turn converted it into a Christian church and changed the name of the Pantheon to the Santa Maria ad Martyrs; which resulted in the Pantheon being saved from abandonment and destruction. After the Renaissance the Pantheon was used as a tomb, many distinguished figures of the times were buried here, such as the painter Raphael, the composer Arcangelo Corelli, and the architect Baldassare Peruzzi. Also Architects during this time, like Brunelleschi, used the Pantheon as inspiration when he was designing the Cathedral of Florence's dome.

Museum Collection 4

Islamic Civilization

The most well known fiction from the Islamic world was The Book of One Thousand and One Nights, known as Arabian Nights in the West is a compilation of fantasy stories gathered over thousands of years, by many authors, and scholars in various countries. This has been an influential piece of literature in the West, since it was translated in the 18th century by Antoine Galland. Many of the characters became cultural icons in Western culture, such as Aladdin, Sinbad and Ali Baba. These collections of tales trace their roots back to ancient Arabia and Yemen, ancient India, Persia, Egypt, Mesopotamian Mythology, Syria, and medieval Arabic folk stories. (Wikipedia, 2008) The original manuscript was never found, but several versions date the collection to around AD 800-900. Interestingly enough some of the best known...
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