Multiple Sclerosis

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Thesis Statement

Multiple Sclerosis is mainly an inflammatory disorder of the brain and spinal cord in which central lymphocytic permeation leads to harm of the myelin scabbard and axons. Initially, inflammation is temporary and re-myelination occurs but is not long-lasting. Hence, the early course of disease is characterized by occurrences of neurological dysfunction that usually recover. However, over time the pathological alterations start to take over by widespread microglia activation associated with broad and constant neuro-degeneration, the clinical correlate of which is progressive growth of disability. Para-clinical investigations show abnormalities that specify the distribution of inflammatory lesions and axonal loss (MRI); hindrance of transmission in previously myelinated pathways (evoked electrophysiological potentials); and intrathecal combination of oligoclonal antibody (examination by lumbar puncture of the cerebral fluid). Multiple sclerosis is triggered by ecological dynamics in individuals with multifarious genetic-risk profiles. Licensed disease modifying agents lessen the rate of recurrence of new episodes, but do not repeal fixed insufficiencies and have questionable outcomes on the long-term accumulation of disability and disease development. They foresee that future studies in Multiple sclerosis will provide a new classification on the center of mechanisms rather than clinical empiricism, and so enlighten strategies of improved treatment at all stages of the disease.

III.Environmental factor
IV.Geography of MS and migrations
VI.Disease mechanisms
VII.Management and treatment
IX.Perceived Control
X.Past, present, and future
XI.The future of treatment


Falvo, D. R., (2009). Medical and Psychosocial Aspects of Chronic Illness and Disability. Jones and Bartlett. Malachy Bishop, Michael P Frain, Molly K Tschopp. (2008). Self-Management, Perceived Control, and Subjective Quality of Life in Multiple Sclerosis: An Explorative Study. Rehabilitation Counseling Bulletin, 52 (1), 45-56. Retrieved January 19, 2009, from Research Library database. (Document ID: 1569636991). Matthew A Plow, Virgil Mathiowetz, Linda Resnik. (2008). Multiple Sclerosis: Impact of Physical Activity on Psychosocial Constructs. American Journal of Health Behavior, 32(6), 614-26. Retrieved January 19, 2009, from ProQuest Education Journals database. (Document ID: 1592737461). Alastair Compston, Alasdair Coles (2008). Multiple sclerosis. The Lancet, 372(9648), 1502-17. Retrieved January 19, 2009, from Research Library database. (Document ID: 1589446661)

The theory of analysis is to begin from scientific proof, increased by laboratory studies, that disease activity which is constant with central de-myelination has affected more than one part of the central nervous system and more than one instance. In most patients, medical symptoms show the involvement of motor, sensory, visual, and autonomic systems but many other indications and indications can occur. Few of the clinical aspects are disease-specific, but particularly distinctive are Lhermitte’s symptom (an electrical sensation running down the spine or limbs on neck flexion) and the Uhthoff phenomenon (transient worsening of symptoms and signs when core body heat increases, such as after exercise or a hot bath). New-fangled criteria allow for safe and early on diagnosis, which shuns incorrect acknowledgment of symptoms and signs in youthful adults to multiple sclerosis, and allows timely conversation about management before tissue damage has compromised the capability to carry out activities of everyday living. In many circumstances, medical evidence is adequate for establishment of the diagnosis is uncertain, par clinical features can choose the issue. MRI shows important or confluent irregularities in white matter in more than ninety-five percent...
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