Mrsa

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Topic: MRSA and You.

General Purpose : To inform

Specific Purpose: To inform the audience about the bacteria Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus.

Thesis Statement: MRSA is an infection caused by a strain of Staphylococcus that has become resistant to antibiotics commonly used to treat staph infections.

Preview Statement: Many of you have heard of MRSA, today im going to tell you exactly what type of bacteria it is and how to minimize your exposure to it.

Introduction:

Attention Getting Device: Did you know that some bacteria can adapt to the antibiotics that your doctor prescribes to you and can become Resistant to that certain antibiotic.

Background: Working in a hospital I’ve seen many patients on contact isolation where you have to place a gown and gloves on before entering the room. Most of them are on isolation because of an infection called MRSA.

Thesis Statement: MRSA is an infection caused by a strain of Staphylococcus that has become resistant to antibiotics commonly used to treat staph infections.

Preview Statement: Many of you have heard of MRSA, today im going to tell you exactly what type of Bacteria it is and how to minimize your exposure to it.

Body:
I. Some germs that commonly live on the skin and in the nose are called Staphylococcus or “staph” bacteria. Usually staph bacteria doesn’t cause any harm.
A. Sometimes staph get inside the body through a break in the skin and cause an infection. These infections are treated by antibiotics. When the antibiotics don’t kill the staph bacteria it means the bacteria has become resistant to those antibiotics. This type of staph is called MRSA ( Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus).

B. MRSA infections are not only infections of the skin but can serious infections in your blood, lungs and other tissues. Because they are resistant to many antibiotics they are harder to treat.

[Transition] : Now that you are familiar with what MRSA is lets talk...
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