Mr Hehe

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 80
  • Published : January 22, 2013
Open Document
Text Preview
Whitepaper:    The Three Essential Components of   Employee Engagement   
By Tracy M. Maylett and Juan M. Riboldi 

 

Copyright 2008, DecisionWise, Inc.

Table of Contents: 
The Concept of Engagement.........1  What do We Want Most? .............2  Three Scenarios ............................2  DecisionWise Employee   Engagement Model.......................3  Different Strokes for   Different Folks ..............................3  Measuring Engagement ................4  Engagement Surveys.....................5  The Impact of Engagement ...........5  Engagement Leads to Success ......6  About the Authors ........................7  About DecisionWise......................7 

The Three Essential Components of  Employee Engagement    Understanding the role of Motivation, Satisfaction, and Effectiveness in  Driving Engagement and Increasing Organization Performance    By Tracy M. Maylett, Ed.D   & Juan M. Riboldi, MBA/OB        You know you want employees who are motivated, satisfied, and engaged—or at least  you think that’s what you’re aiming for. Regardless, you know you want them to be  productive and effective. You make a fair attempt to measure levels of employee  satisfaction, but your “employee satisfaction survey” doesn’t tell you what you really  want to know—how engaged are your employees in what they are doing? Do they do  more than show up? Do they bring their hands, minds, and hearts to the job?     Organizations of all sizes are lining up behind initiatives aimed at improving employee  engagement. The rise of engagement surveys, workshops, and publications attest to the  increased interest behind this concept. Yet managers, HR professionals, consultants, and  academics alike often pose the simple, straight‐forward questions: “What is Employee  Engagement and how do we measure it?”    

The Concept of Engagement  
The idea of engagement did not simply spring from a noble management effort to  ensure employees were happy. It arose from the need for increased productivity—the  ability to get greater output from effort.     As competition increased following World War II, companies realized that they could  better ensure levels of productivity by retaining and getting the most from their labor  force. But one significant difference came to the forefront that did not exist previously.  Employees now had choices. Contrary to what much of the previous generation  experienced, many employees could now choose to leave an organization for more  favorable work. Under these conditions, managers became more focused on employees  as a way to increase the bottom line. They needed employees who not only brought  their hands to their work, but their minds and hearts as well.     As the real value of an organization shifted from tangible assets (brick and mortar,  machines, vehicles, property, tools, etc.) to intellectual assets (know‐how, customer  relationships, proprietary information, etc.), what existed in people’s minds and hearts  was becoming more valuable. Today, the ability to learn, change, and adapt is  increasingly becoming the greatest sustainable competitive advantage. Today’s  workforce faces daunting challenges to cut costs, improve quality, increase production,  and develop new products and services at a faster speed. While some organizations  struggle or fail, others are able to cope with the increasing demands. Because of these  global trends, the value of human capital is even greater now than ever before. A key  factor in tapping this capital is engagement. 

Copyright 2008, DecisionWise, Inc..  www.decwise.com | 800.830.8086 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

       Page 1 

What do We Want Most?  
To better grasp the concept, ask yourself the simple question: “What do we want most  from our employees?” Intuitively, we know it when we see it. Consider the following  examples:     • A salesperson works well past five o’clock to secure a deal that helps the ...
tracking img