Mr Boraine

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HSC 3045 Promote positive behaviour
1.2
“Restrictive physical intervention” here means “the use of force to restrict movement or mobility or the use of force to disengage from dangerous or harmful physical contact initiated by pupils or service users”. Restrictive physical intervention differs from non restrictive, manual guidance or restrictive physical prompting in so far as it implies the use of force against resistance. The main difference between holding and restrictive physical intervention is the manner of the intervention and the degree of force applied. Restrictive physical intervention should: • be used at the minimum level for the shortest period of time • be used in the service users best interests

• respect the cultural experiences of service users and the attitudes towards physical control • avoid contact that might be misinterpreted as sexual
• be accompanied by reassuring speech and never with threats (http://www.cambridgeshire.gov.uk)

1.3
Restrictive interventions have a serious potential for infringing individual rights and for causing harm to them as well as staff. This is the least desirable way of addressing challenging behaviour and is considered as a last resort method. When it is used it should be used with least restrictive interventions as it can be very intimidating for an individual who is vulnerable and unable to get control of themselves. By using the least restrictive intervention it can stop a situation from escalating.

Restrictive interventions can be used when reasonable force is necessary in order to restrict the movement of an individual to protect them from injury or harm and others around. Some examples of when this may be used are: * When there is significant destruction done to a property * Violence directed to others

* Violence that arises from panic, distress or confusion
* Self-directed violence or self injury such as:
* Head butting
* Hair pulling
* Self harming
* Cutting own skin
* Self-induced vomiting

A restrictive intervention is unacceptable as a source of punishment. Under no circumstances should it be threatened upon or used as a disciplinary sanction, or as a means to intentionally humiliate, degrade or to discriminate.

1.4
When an incident has occurred and restrictive intervention has been used it would be reported to: * Your line manager
* MVA co-ordinator

After this there would be a debrief meeting to discuss how it went and if anything could have been done better any why physical intervention was used. There would also be a physical intervention report done.

1.5
When using physical restraint, the level and duration of the restraint should be the minimum necessary to restore safety because the least restrictive are in the best interest of the individual. This is because restrictive intervention of an individual who is aggressive or highly agitated could increase their level of aggression and agitation. The use of overly restrictive interventions may violate the individual’s rights, dignity and safety.

1.6
Restrictive interventions are only justified when they are used in the best interest of the service user or to protect the safety of others. Intrusive forms of physical interventions which are often used as a responsive to violence are potentially harmful. A care service will always have a policy statement which makes explicit the safeguards which must be in place before physical intervention is used. These are as followed- * It is only done so by suitably trained staff

* Safety and welfare of subject is paramount
* Only permitted techniques are used
* Minimum amount of time for intervention

2.1/2.3
proactive strategies include: preparing, supporting and equipping the individual to behave in a positive way e.g. person centred approach, setting boundaries and agreeing ground rules as appropriate to the needs of the individual, the use of positive, realistic and...
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