Mozart Effect

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“Mozart Effect”

The Mozart effect has two general definitions. Firstly, it is a set of research results that indicate that listening to Mozart's music may induce a short-term improvement on the performance of certain kinds of mental tasks known as "spatial-temporal reasoning". And also it is popularized versions of the theory, which suggest that "listening to Mozart makes you smarter", or that early childhood exposure to classical music has a beneficial effect on mental development. The term was first found by Alfred A. Tomatis who used Mozart's music as the listening stimulus in his work attempting to cure a variety of disorders. The approach has been popularized in a book by Don Campbell. It is based on an experiment published in “Nature”, which supposed that listening to Mozart improved students' IQ by 8 to 9 points. As a result, the Governor of Georgia, Zell Miller, sponsored some money to provide every child born in Georgia with a CD of classical music. Another experiment that agrees with the claim was made by Bellarmine College. The Department of Psychology at the college tested the spatial reasoning of the participants in a study by having them complete pencil-and-paper labyrinths of varying complexity. The students were given eight minutes to complete as many mazes as possible. If the Mozart effect is replicable, then the participant's performances on the mazes should be enhanced after listening to Mozart's music relative to the other two listening conditions. They found that of the 22 volunteers, the average student completed 2.68 mazes in 8 minutes after listening to Mozart's music. After listening to different types of music, the average student only completed 2.2 mazes, and after being in silence, the average student completed 1.73 mazes. Other researchers argue that the "Mozart Effect" is only an artifact of the short-term effects of music listening on mood and arousal. For example, William Forde Thompson, Gabriela Husain, and Glenn...
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