Moving Toward Nationhood

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The history of our country moving toward nationhood is very complex. The colonists because dissatisfied with English rule because they believed they were not included in the English Parliament. They were not able to do some things, which made them unhappy. This lead to the relationships between the colonies and English getting worse when Parliament began taxing colonists for trade goods to pay for the war debts. Then, in 1774 and 1775, colonists started taking steps toward independence by organizing the colonies and holding meetings to discuss concerns the colonists had and eventually voting for independence. Finally, in 1776 the Declaration of Independence was adopted and made all people created equally with rights that a government couldn’t take away. Afterwards, in the late 1770’s and early 1780’s, colonists defended their new independence by fighting in the American Revolutionary War against British soldiers. They did this for a few reasons and one of them being unfair taxation on goods and property. Once the colonies because free and independent states, the Articles of Confederation was written to reunite the states, which called for Congress to pass on to the 13 states which had one vote each. Everything was not perfect, though. The government had the problem of dealing with the struggling economy after the Revolutionary War. They had many debts that needed paying off, but they didn’t have the money to do so. Likewise, farmers were also affected by the economic crisis in the colonies. To show how they felt, a farmer named Daniel Shays, along with hundreds of farmers stormed into the courthouse to disrupt business. This event alone forced Americans to realize they needed a stronger national government to help with the economy and to keep law and order. This is the story of how America moved toward nationhood.
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