Movie Review of Still Ready: Three Women from the Moroccan Resistance

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Morocco got its independence on November 18, 1956. That is a fact that has been written in the history of Moroccan culture. A fact that one cannot look up on Morocco, is that women had a great part in the resistance. In Moroccan culture, women are recognized neither as important agents of history, nor as reliable reporters and interpreters of history. In the film, “Still Ready: Three Women from Moroccan Resistance”, three women who were apart of the resistance report how their involvement was not only important but the main reason Morocco is Independent. Ghalia Moujhide, Saadia Bouhaddou, and Rabiaa Taibi, are the names of each woman who gave their lives for their home. Using these three women unique story I will tell what happened when Moroccan women took on “men’s roles” in the independence movement, as well as to explain the relationship between that chapter in history and the roles of women in present day Morocco. Ghalia Moujhide was the first woman that appeared on the film to tell her story. She relived her past on top of a roof top. Since the viewer could see her in entirety a long shot must had been taken during the recordeing of the film.She starts her story not with childhood memories but with the resistance. The vewier is drawn in immediately to her story. Behind her voice you can feel the pain of the past seeping through. Just as like the other two women Ghalia transported weapons as well as delivered messages. Through Ghalia had similar jobs as the other women her experience was the most traumatic. Ghalia was the only women to go in to great detail about being caught; sharing a very painful memory with the viewer. Ghalia had been taken from her home and had been beat for days. The beatings were so bad that Ghalia suffered long time damages. During the interview Ghalia coughed so badly and her hands could no longer close properly. With lifelong damages to her hands she could not find work. Saadia Bouhaddou starts her story with her childhood. Since...
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