Motivational Techniques of Google

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Google's Corporate Values and Goals and How they Motivate Their Employees Clearly stated and conveyed organizational goals do more than just let the general public know what the organization aims to achieve, but also can serve as a driving force for employees of the organization. Google's recent success in the hyper-competitive Internet search engine industry is based, in part, in their ability to utilize their corporate goals to drive daily actions geared towards achieving these goals, and has helped propel the company to success. To fully understand how Google's corporate values and goals concerning employees, their customers, and the Internet motivate their employees, this paper analyzes the company's stated goals and how they relate to the Employee Satisfaction Model and motivational theories.Google's Corporate Values and Goals and How they Motivate Their Employees Clearly stated and conveyed organizational goals do more than just let the general public know what the organization aims to achieve, but also can serve as a driving force for employees of the organization. Google's recent success in the hyper-competitive Internet search engine industry is based, in part, in their ability to utilize their corporate goals to drive daily actions geared towards achieving these goals, and has helped

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Google meets the first two levels of needs with competitive salary packages and excellent benefits. It has been demonstrated that employee satisfaction affects organizational performance in general. As mentioned, their goal is to make the massive amounts of information on the Internet, easily accessible to everyone. This leads to the fulfillment of self-actualization as well, as employees continue self-improvement through continued education, explore creative ideas, and truly work towards being the best that they can be. Google's stated goal is: "to organize the world's information and make it universally accessible and useful" ("Company overview", 2007). Maslow's hierarchy of needs is structured with five levels, with the lower needs needing to be satisfied first before the individual seeks fulfillment of the next higher level. These levels include: basic physiological needs, safety and security, social belonging, esteem needs, and self-actualization (Skemp-Arlt & Toupence, 2007). By using this model, an organization can improve strategies to further employee satisfaction. In addition, employee satisfaction influences an organization's customer perceptions of service quality. Satisfied employees not only increase productivity and reduce turnover, but also enhance creativity and commitment (Chen, Yang, Shiau, & Wang, 2006). They are the organization's internal customers. This goal gives employees a sense of purpose, enhancing their self-esteem and sense of belonging for being a part of this grander goal. The word motivation is often defined as "getting someone moving." Motivation theory breaks down these forces into internal or intrinsic motivation and external or extrinsic motivation. If you're in a leadership role, it's important to understand how employees are motivated and what you can do as a leader to keep them motivated. Motivation Theory

When we motivate ourselves or someone else, we are developing those incentives or conditions that we believe will help move a person to a desired behavior. Whether it is through intrinsic motivation or extrinsic motivation, most individuals are moved by their beliefs, values, personal interests and even fear. One of the more difficult challenges to a leader is to learn how to effectively motivate those working for them. One of the reasons it's so difficult is because motivation can be so personal. Typically, inexperienced leaders believe that the same factors that motivate themselves will motivate others. Another misconception that inexperienced leaders believe is that the same factors that motivate one employee will work on another. In fact, nothing could be...
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