Motivational Strategies in the Work Place

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 387
  • Published : July 18, 2012
Open Document
Text Preview
MASTERS IN MANAGERIAL PSYCHOLOGY (PART-TIME)
PSYCHOLOGICAL ANALYSIS AND WORKPLACE MANAGEMENT
MMP 701

ASSIGNMENT
1. FIND OUT EXISITING MOTIVATIONAL STRATEGIES IN THE
WORKPLACE
2. IDENTIFY MOTIVATIONAL STRATEGIES THAT ARE APPLICABLE IN YOUR WORKPLACE

NAME
AKINWALE BABATUNDE AYORINDE

29TH JUNE 2012

EXISTING MOTIVATIONAL STRATEGIES IN THE WORK PLACE
Effective motivational strategies have a tremendous impact on productivity in the workplace. An engaged and motivated workforce can make the difference between a successful business and a dying business. Some motivation strategies that can be employed include Empowering employees

Empowerment occurs when individuals in an organization are given autonomy, authority, trust, and encouragement to accomplish a task. Empowerment is designed to unshackle the worker and to make a job the worker's responsibility. In an attempt to empower and to change some of the old bureaucratic ideas, managers are promoting corporate intrapreneurships. Intrapreneurship encourages employees to pursue new ideas and gives them the authority to promote those ideas. Obviously, intrapreneurship is not for the timid, because old structures and processes are turned upside down. Google engineers are encouraged to take 20% of their time to work on something company related that interests them personally. The logic is people would work better when they are involved in something they are passionate about and many cool technologies have their origins in 20% time including; google news, Gmail and even Google shuttle that brings people to work at the company’s headquarters. Providing an effective reward system

Managers often use rewards to reinforce employee behavior that they want to continue. A reward is a work outcome of positive value to the individual. Organizations are rich in rewards for people whose performance accomplishments help meet organizational objectives. People receive rewards in one of the following two ways: * Extrinsic rewards are externally administered. They are valued outcomes given to someone by another person, typically a supervisor or higher level manager. Common workplace examples are pay bonuses, promotions, time off, special assignments, office fixtures, awards, verbal praise, and so on. In all cases, the motivational stimulus of extrinsic rewards originates outside the individual. * Intrinsic rewards are self-administered. Think of the “natural high” a person may experience after completing a job. That person feels good because she has a feeling of competency, personal development, and self-control over her work. In contrast to extrinsic rewards, the motivational stimulus of intrinsic rewards is internal and doesn't depend on the actions of other people. To motivate behavior, the organization needs to provide an effective reward system. An effective reward system has four elements: * Rewards need to satisfy the basic needs of all employees. * Rewards need to be included in the system and be comparable to ones offered by a competitive organization in the same area. * Rewards need to be available to people in the same positions and be distributed fairly and equitably. * The overall reward system needs to be multifaceted. Because all people are different, managers must provide a range of rewards—pay, time off, recognition, or promotion. In addition, managers should provide several different ways to earn these rewards. Rewards demonstrate to employees that their behavior is appropriate and should be repeated. If employees don't feel that their work is valued, their motivation will decline.

Redesigning jobs
Many people go to work every day and go through the same, unenthusiastic actions to perform their jobs. These individuals often refer to this condition as...
tracking img