Motivational Methods

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 198
  • Published : April 22, 2013
Open Document
Text Preview
Motivational Methods
LS
HCS/325
4/15/2013
Sharon Sauls

Motivational Methods

Many organizations throughout the nation have resorted to downsizing and it is becoming more common. As a manager, having the strength to motivate your staff even when your business has hit its darkest hour can be daunting. Some organizations have downsized departments, as others have to cease operations completely. Everything from fortune 500 to ambulances companies are making adjustments to adapt to fiscal changes. Downsizing is a big part of a broader workforce strategy, designed to closely align with the overall strategy of the business. Layoffs become a tool in a business portfolio as an alternative to improve the firm’s performance. Management may view this as an opportunity to enhance the organization’s medium- and long-term agility through well-planned and targeted coaching, change and career-management interventions (Employee Policy Research Network, 2013). In downsizing a company, one needs to motivate your staff. Motivation is used in management to describe forces within individuals that account for the level, direction, and persistence of effort they expend at work. Simply put, a highly motivated person works hard at a job; an unmotivated person does not (Lombardi, Schermerhorn, & Kraver, 2007). Motivational methods are what can make a difference with your employees.

In downsizing, companies often fail to see the big picture, which is when you downsize even for the right reasons it comes at a cost. Missed opportunities such as: * Loss business due to fewer staff

* Reduced productivity when high performers of the organization leave as morale decreases

Layoffs at high-involvement workplaces such as fortune 500 companies, the management strategies that give employees the skills, information, and motivation to be competitive, can be markedly more detrimental than layoffs at an average company. Overall, the significant and direct costs associated with employment downsizing may wipe out the direct savings in labor costs. In light of the serious short- and long-term consequences that typically accompany employment downsizing, it would benefit senior executives to consider carefully the strategic impact of such a strategy (Employee Policy Research Network, 2013). Some downsizing strategies that will not affect moral are: * Attrition

* Voluntary termination
* Early-retirement incentives
By using some of these downsizing strategies, you can eliminate employees that want to go as oppose to ones that do not.

As a manager, it is important to not use the same motivational techniques repeatedly on the same person. Always using different methods, every time is more of a motivational challenge than using the same ones. A manager should get to know its employees, and figure out which employees like what, and what is the position the employee is in first off before a manager starts using methods on employees (Dobelstien, 2012). The three motivational methods that would work well is setting a good example and recognizing the hard work the staff does by giving them praise. The second is to be a respectful manager, and the last is to invest in your employees.

The first motivational method is to always lead by example. A great leader is one who knows that they have to show their employees how to act at all times. In addition, an inspirational leader is one who recognizes that they do not succeed without hard working employees and to tell them at all times. Everyone wants praise, and it is one of the easiest things to give. Praise from a manager goes a lot farther than one might think. Praise every improvement that you see your team members make. As a manager, it takes time to become comfortable delivering praise one-on-one to an employee. Once you do try praising them in front of others (INC, 2013). The...
tracking img