Motivation of Staff for Events

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‘An understanding of the motivational process is a prerequisite for event success. This is true when motivating full time, part time or volunteer staff’.

1. Define ‘motivation’

2. Introduction
a. Why is motivation important in events?
b. Pulsating organisation structure
c. Examples of events
d. Set up answers

3. Main body

a. Step 1 Full time staff (in service operations chapter) i. Adams equity theory
ii. Describe
iii. Critique
iv. Apply to events

b. Step 2 Part-time staff (in Ted Video)
i. Intrinsic/extrinsic
ii. Ted talk – Dan Punk
iii. Critique
iv. Apply an example to events

c. Step 3 volunteerism (academics, theory and readings) i. Discuss
ii. Critique
iii. Apply example

4. Conclusions 3-4 lines

Answer 3:

1. First of all, it is important to know what motivation is. ‘Motivation covers all the reasons which cause a person to act, including negative ones like fear along with the more positive motives, such as money, promotion or recognition’ (Adair, 2006).

2. But why is motivation so important in events? As Bowdin et al (2001) say, ‘the ability to motivate other staff members is a fundamental component of the event manager’s skills. Without this motivation, paid employees and volunteers can lack the enthusiasm for achieving the organisations goals and delivering quality customer service.’

So motivation can be seen as crucial success factor of an event, influencing the overall experience of the attendee in terms of service quality.

Moreover, as Blichfeldt et al (2013) say, all decisions made by consumers are motivation driven, which means that it’s already important at the total beginning – when a consumer decides to go to an event or not.

b) The organisational structure of an event is a pulsating one, means that it starts with a few people working on it, develops itself to an organisation with an increasing number of employees closer to the event itself and starts to decrease this number afterwards again. This pulsating structure makes motivation even more important for event success, since its structure and staff are constantly changing.

As result of this pulsating organisational structure, there are different kinds of employees involved in an event, namely divided into full time, part-time staff and volunteers.

d) For the purpose of this exam, I will discuss in detail the importance of motivation and the different motivational processes in combination with full time, part time and volunteer staff. Therefore, I will address Adams equity theory as well the difference of intrinsic and extrinsic motivation, and why money is not always the right solution for motivation.

c) To underline these issues in events, I am going to involve a couple of examples in the following discussion amongst others the Glastonbury Festival and Festival by the Sea.

3a) Let’s begin with the motivation of full time staff. Full time staff is way harder to motivate or better has to be motivated on a different way than part-time or volunteer staff. Since the part-time and volunteer staffs spend less time in their job than full time staff, they have more time to balance their private and office life and get some diversification. With full time staff there is often the risk that they work too much time on the same kind of task, which could result in boredom and less motivation.

Furthermore, the climate in the office plays a huge role. According to Adams (1963) when people feel fairly or advantageously treated they are more likely to be motivated, while when they feel unfairly treated they are highly prone to feelings of disaffection and demotivation. The problem here is, that people like to compare themselves with each other in terms of their inputs and outputs. They measure their own input and output with ratios of referent others. Which means that people are likely to compare their own inputs, that...
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