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Motivation Evaluation

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Motivation Evaluation
Carrie Kurtz
PSY 230
12/6/12
Wendy Conaway, Ph.D.

The famous person that I chose to write about is Harrison Ford. Harrison Ford started off as a cabinetmaker. He did this job for fifteen years, just to make sure that he was able to pay his bills and put food on the table every day. Harrison Ford worked as a stagehand for The Doors, he built sound studios for Sergio Mendes, and he made cabinets for George Lucas. At the time George Lucas was not a well-known producer like he is now and he was producing the film American Graffiti. He offered Harrison Ford a small role in the film to make a little extra money and Harrison said yes. Later, as George Lucas become more famous, he asked Harrison Ford to do construction work for a bigger office. One day while doing construction, Harrison Ford was asked by George Lucas to read lines for the actors who were absent. The film just happened to be Star Wars. The off-the-cuff performance impressed Stephen Spielberg and he offered the lead role to Harrison Ford. The movie Star Wars ended up being the highest-grossing movie in history. Because of this movie Harrison Ford began a long career in Hollywood.

I think that Maslow’s theory of motivation fits this story very well. At the bottom of the hierarchy are physiological needs. Harrison Ford began working as a carpenter because he needed money in order to have food to eat. He worked at a carpenter for fifteen years so that he had security in life, which fits the need for safety. The need for safety is the second level in the hierarchy. As for the third level, the need for belongingness and love, it is possible that Ford read the lines for the absent actors in order to be accepted by the other actors and by George Lucas. The forth level is esteem needs. Ford may have accepted the role in Star Wars to have esteem from others. The last level in the hierarchy is self-actualization, which is what motivates people to fulfill their...