Motivating the Salesforce

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Motivating the Sales Force and Wittner Shoes Australia

Table of Contents
1. Executive Summary
2. Introduction
3. Motivation Theories
3.1 Maslow’s hierarchy of needs theory
3.2 Herzberg’s dual factor theory
3.3 Vroom’s expectancy theory
3.4 Adam’s equity theory
4. Motivating Salespeople
4.1 Financial compensation
4.2 Non-financial compensation
5. Motivation within Wittner Shoes Australia
6. Recommendations
7. Conclusion
8. References

1. Executive Summary
This report focuses on motivation, in particular motivation of a sales force, and the motivation of the sales force within the company Wittner Shoes Australia. Four key theories of motivation are identified; these are Maslow’s hierarchy of needs theory, Herzberg’s dual factor theory, Vroom’s expectancy theory and Adam’s equity theory. When focusing on motivating a sales force both financial compensation and non-financial compensation can be used. However, sales people are more than often strongly financially motivated which is why most sales forces are motivated with commissioned sales. Wittner Shoes Australia is a good example of a company that successfully uses financial compensation and non-financial compensation to motivate their employees. However, recommendations on different ways to motivate their staff are given as there is still room for improvement. Motivation is a very important concept as motivated employees are linked to happy customers and happy customers are linked to higher productivity.

2. Introduction
Motivation refers to the forces within a person which influences their direction, intensity and persistence of goal-directed behaviour (Heckhausen & Heckhausen, 2008; McShane & Travaglione, 2005). McShane & Travaglione (2005) identify the two main categories that motivation theories fall into. These are content theories of motivation and process theories of motivation. The content approach focuses on the assumption that people are motivated by their inclination to satisfy internal needs (Borkowski, 2010). Content theories help managers gain an understanding of what arouses, energises and iniates their employees' behaviour (Borkowski, 2010). Process theories of motivation have more of a focus on the psychological processes underlying an individual's levels of motivation (Borkowski, 2010). Process theories of motivation help managers understand why employees behave the way they do, which can then help managers understand, predict and influence employee performance, attendance and job satisfaction (McShane & Travaglione, 2005). The motivation theories which are categorised as content theories of motivation include Maslow's hierarchy of needs theory and Herzberg’s dual factor theory. Whereas the motivation theories which are categorised as process theories of motivation include Vroom’s expectancy theory of motivation and Adam’s equity theory (McShane & Travaglione, 2005). There are numerous more content and process motivational theories but the theories detailed in this report are more relevant to motivating a sales force, and therefore more relevant to motivating the employees at Wittner Shoes Australia.

3. Motivation Theories
3.1 Maslow’s hierarchy of needs theory
According to Maslow's hierarchy of needs theory for motivation there are five basic categories of needs that are hierarchically organised. At the bottom of the hierarchy are physiological needs followed by security and safety, belongingness, esteem and self-actualisation needs (Mathes, 1981). Maslow believed that an individual's behaviour is motivated simultaneously by numerous needs levels but behaviour is mostly motivated by the lowest unsatisfied need of the individual at the time (McShane & Travaglione, 2005). As the individual satisfies a lower-level need, the next highest need in the hierarchy becomes the primary motivator (McShane & Travaglione, 2005).

3.2 Herzberg’s...
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