Mormons Place and Conduct of Worship

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  • Topic: Joseph Smith, Jr., The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints
  • Pages : 2 (391 words )
  • Download(s) : 95
  • Published : December 1, 2012
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To Mormons, also known as Latter-day Saints, seeking the will of the lord in the temple is a very important role in their life. There in the temple, Mormons are taught the holy truths and make solemn covenants in the name of Jesus Christ.

In each temple there are special areas for all of the different types of ordinances. There is an area for baptism of the dead that has a large baptismal font supported by twelve sculpted oxen. Also, there are cubicles for people to become ritually washed and anointed before their endowments can be performed. Endowments are when Mormons make covenants and receive promises and blessings. A Mormons first visit to the temple for their endowment is an important event in their life. Because they are considered very sacred, dedicated Latter-day Saint temples are restricted to the Mormons only; they are not open to the public. Mormons don’t even talk about the details of the ceremonies outside the temple. When entering the temple you are permitted to wear all-white clothing and speak in only quiet voices. The temples are not open on Sunday because Sabbath day is dedicated to worship the lord in their homes and community meetings. Mormons mainly worship during Sunday meetings. These meetings usually last for three hours. Sacrament meetings however last only a little over an hour and are the main focus of worshiping on Sundays. Also, children have primary classes while teenagers and adults have classes on scripture and Mormon history. In addition, adult men are divided into certain age groups where they attend priesthood meetings while woman have to attend a meeting called Relief Society. While in their homes, Mormons often participate in group prayers within the family every morning and evening. On Monday nights, Mormon families gather for recreational activities such as games and gospel lessons.

Works Cited
Allen, James B. Mormonism and American Culture. New York: Harper & Row, 1972. Print. Interpretations of American...
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