More Fallacies Quiz

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  • Topic: Fallacy, Logical fallacies, Ad hominem
  • Pages : 13 (2514 words )
  • Download(s) : 295
  • Published : July 20, 2010
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More Fallacies Quiz I
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Results Reporter|
|
Out of 3 questions, you answered 2 correctly with a final grade of 67%| | | | |
| 2 correct (67%)| | |
| 1 incorrect (33%)| | |
| 0 unanswered (0%)| | |

Your Results:|
The correct answer for each question is indicated by a . | -------------------------------------------------
Top of Form

Please answer all questions.
|
1 CORRECT| |
It is fair to say that all rhetorical devices tempt us to accept a claim or modify our position on an issue without our having a good reason for doing so.| | | A)| True|
| | B)| False|
| | | | |
Feedback: Reason is not the only thing that affects beliefs, attitudes, and feelings. Rhetorical devices employ everything but reason to influence someone's acceptance of a claim.| |
2 INCORRECT| |
An appeal to ignorance is an ad hominem attack where the intelligence of the arguer is impugned.| | | A)| True|
| | B)| False|
| | | | |
|
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3 CORRECT| |
It is fallacious to conclude that a person's claim should be dismissed if it is determined that they are hypocritical on the subject.| | | A)| True|
| | B)| False|
| | | | |
Feedback: To do so would be to commit an ad hominem fallacy. Whether the person making the claim is a hypocrite, an ax murderer, omniscient, or more devoted to the imperative not to lie than Immanuel Kant, should be irrelevant in judging the argument they are forwarding.| More Fallacies Quiz II

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Results Reporter|
|
Out of 27 questions, you answered 13 correctly with a final grade of 48%| | | | |
| 13 correct (48%)| | |
| 14 incorrect (52%)| | |
| 0 unanswered (0%)| | |

Your Results:|
The correct answer for each question is indicated by a . | Top of Form

|
1 CORRECT| |
From the list below, select the name of the rhetorical device that attacks the arguer instead of the argument.| | | A)| Slippery slope|
| | B)| Begging the question|
| | C)| False dilemma|
| | D)| Ad hominem|
| | E)| Burden of proof|
| | F)| Straw man|
| | | | |
Feedback: When analyzing an argument, the internal claims—premises—are fair game for attack. The qualities of the person making the argument are not fair game because they aren't pertinent to the argument itself.| |

2 INCORRECT| |
From the list below, select the name of the rhetorical device that unfairly places the onus of providing evidence for a position on the wrong side of an issue.| | | A)| Slippery slope|
| | B)| Begging the question|
| | C)| False dilemma|
| | D)| Ad hominem|
| | E)| Burden of proof|
| | F)| Straw man|
| | | | |
|
|
3 CORRECT| |
From the list below, select the name of the rhetorical device that ignores an opponent's actual position and instead presents and attacks a distorted, oversimplified, or misrepresented version of that position.| | | A)| Slippery slope|

| | B)| Begging the question|
| | C)| False dilemma|
| | D)| Ad hominem|
| | E)| Burden of proof|
| | F)| Straw man|
| | | | |
Feedback: This is, arguably, the most frustrating fallacy to combat when it's hurled at you. To stay engaged in the debate, you must first untangle and correct the distortions, oversimplifications, and misrepresented versions your opponent is working with. Then, you may proceed with your rebuttal. Of course, all your opponent has to do is continue creating 'straw men' out of everything you say and you'll remain occupied for as long as he wants you to be. It is often best to refuse to deal with people who have no qualms about using this rhetorical technique (if at all possible).| |

4 CORRECT| |
From the list below, select the name of the rhetorical device that limits consideration to only two alternatives when there...
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