Moon and Lunar Orbit

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  • Topic: Indian Space Research Organisation, Moon, Chandrayaan-1
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  • Published : August 11, 2011
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BEHAVIOURAL SCIENCE PROJECT
ON

CHANDRAYAAN-1

SUBMITTED BY:

CONTENTS:-

ABOUT CHANDRAYAAN-1

LAUNCH PROCESS

OBJECTIVES

SPECIFICATIONS

AREAS OF STUDY

SUCCESS OF CHANDRAYAAN-1

REACTIONS AND STATEMENTS

FUTURE: CHANDRAYAAN-2

MISCELAANEOUS
oNEWSPAPER CUTTING
oPICTURES OF CHANDRAYAAN-1 AND, MOON AND EARTH.

WHAT IS CHANDRAYAAN-1?

IT IS A SPACE CRAFT DESIGNED TO STUDY THE SURFACE OF THE MOON. IT IS DESIGNED AND CREATED BY THE INDIAN SCIENTISTS.

OrganizationIndian Space Research Organisation
Mission typeOrbiter
Satellite ofMoon
Orbital insertion date12 November 2008
Launch date22 October 2008 from Sriharikota, India
Mission duration2 years
Mass523 kg (1,153 lb)

ABOUT CHANDRAYAAN

The moon with the history of the early solar system etched on its beckons mankind from time immemorial to admire its marvels and discover its secrets. Understanding the moon provides a pathway to unravel the early evolution of the solar system and that of the planet earth. Though the ages, the Moon, our closest celestial body has roused curiousty in our mind much more than any other objects in the sky.

Chandrayaan-1, (Sanskrit: चंद्रयान-१, Moon-vehicle) is India's first mission to the moon, launched by India's national space agency the Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO). The unmanned lunar exploration mission includes a lunar orbiter and an impactor. The spacecraft was launched by a modified version of the PSLV XL on 22 October 2008 from Satish Dhawan Space Centre, Sriharikota, Andhra Pradesh at 06:23 IST (00:52 UTC). The vehicle was successfully inserted into lunar orbit on 8 November 2008. The Moon Impact Probe was successfully impacted at the lunar South Pole at 20:31 hours on 14 November 2008. The estimated cost for the project is Rs. 386 crore (US$ 80 million). The remote sensing satellite had a mass of 1,380 kilograms (3,042 lb) at launch and 675 kilograms (1,488 lb) at lunar orbit and carries high resolution remote sensing equipment for visible, near infrared, and soft and hard X-ray frequencies. Over a two-year period, it is intended to survey the lunar surface to produce a complete map of its chemical characteristics and 3-dimensional topography. The Polar Regions are of special interest, as they might contain ice. The lunar mission carries five ISRO payloads and six payloads from other international space agencies including NASA, ESA, and the Bulgarian Aerospace Agency, which were carried free of cost.

On course of launch

BANGALORE: The sticker on the threshold just says, “Spacecraft checkout No.4.” As we entered the mezzanine-like floor on Monday and looked below, the gorgeous looking Chandrayaan-1, enveloped in golden yellow insulation foil, came into view. It was in the dirt-free “clean room” of the ISRO Satellite Centre (ISAC), Bangalore, and men dressed in white overalls, were fussing over it and conducting checks. It had passed a battery of tests in the space simulation chamber (SSC), where it was subjected to extremes of hot and cold temperatures. Tests that unfolded its solar panel, as if were an accordion, and for pointing its antenna were equally successful. It will now face vibration and noise tests. Things are moving ahead for the launch of Chandrayaan-1, India’s first spacecraft to the moon, before the end of October from Sriharikota by a Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle called PSLV-XL. Chandrayaan-1 will carry 11 instruments, five from India and six from abroad. They will map the minerals and chemicals on the lunar soil and also provide clues to the moon’s origin. ISAC Director T.K. Alex called it “a complicated mission” because “for the first time, we are sending a spacecraft beyond the earth’s orbit” (that is, it will orbit the moon). The moon is nearly four lakh km away and the spacecraft has to be...
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