Moods: Sentence and Factual Tense Forms

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  • Topic: Sentence, Grammatical mood, Dependent clause
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  • Published : May 16, 2013
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OBLIQUE MOODS IN SUBJECT CLAUSES

Subjunctive I
a) Of the type:
It is necessary (it seems, it becomes) that he come.
It is important that a young man have real friends.
b) In exclamatory sentences beginning with ‘How…’, ‘What…’: How strange that she be here!

Suppositional mood
a) In sentences beginning with: It is necessary that…
It is important that a young man should have real friends.
(syn. It’s likely + may/might + infinitive
It was probable that I might get an excellent mark.)
b) In exclamatory sentences, beginning with:
How wonderful…!
How strange…!
What a shame…!
How wonderful that he should have joined us!
How sad that I should leave!
c) In negative and interrogative sentences expressing (im)possibility. Is it (un)likely that the reaction should occur?

OBLIQUE MOODS IN PREDICATIVE CLAUSES

Subjunctive I
a) After words with modal meaning (wish, advise, desire, suggest): Our suggestion was that we take a tour round the city.
b) After ‘All I ask is that…’, ‘All we needed was that…’, etc: All I ask is that you listen to me.

Subjunctive II/non factual tense forms
a) After conjunctions as if…, as though…:
It was as if she were trying to tell him something.
b) After verbs be, seem, look, feel, sound:
I feel as though I had never been away.
Indicative mood can be used when one is confident of the exactitude of the comparison: She looks as if she has a bath every morning.

Suppositional mood
a) After words with modal meaning (wish, doubt, proposal, advice, suggestion) My advice is that you should take smb with you.
b) After ‘All I ask is that…’, ‘All we need is that…’: All I ask is that you should listen to me.
c) After words, expressing fear (conj. lest)
Our fear was lest we should be late.
OBLIQUE MOODS IN OBJECT CLAUSES

Subjunctive I
a) After verbs expressing order, request, suggestion:
Tom insisted that we be also present.
b) After the predicative adjectives (sorry, eager) if the action is regarded as an imagined one: Danny was determined that his plan be realized
and his brother leave the house.
c) With formal ‘it’ + objective predicative:
We consider it totally unnecessary that he be bothered again.

Subjunctive II/non factual tense forms
a) After the modal expression ‘would rather’, ‘would sooner’, ‘had better’: I’d rather you cried here with us than all by yourself in there. (would+infinitive = depend on person:
I wish you would treat me more polite.
could, might+infinitive = depend on circumstances)
b) After ‘wish’:
I wish we were both ten years older than we are.
I wish I hadn’t come. (Как жаль…)
c) In indirect questions introduced by ‘if’ or ‘whether’ after the expression of doubt: I doubted if it were possible.
Wondering if he were sick, I went over to find out.

Suppositional mood
a) After verbs expressing order, request, suggestion:
He had never suggested that I should visit them.
b) If in the principle clause a personal reaction to events is expressed: I’m surprised you should want him to stay in that house.
c) After the verb ‘wish’ to express that you want smb or smth to change in future: Oh, how I wish it would stop raining.
d) After verbs expressing fear (conj. that and lest):
I was terrified lest they should notice me.
I am very much afraid that the boy should not go there.
(syn. May/might + Inf
Liz trembled that her plans might be revealed)
e) with formal ‘it’ + objective predicative:
I consider it probable
that they should have been given a negative answer.
We regard it as highly probable
that he may return soon.
f) In indirect questions introduced by ‘that’ after the expression of doubt: I doubted that he should marry her.
OBLIQUE MOODS IN ATTRIBUTIVE (APPOSITIVE) CLAUSES

Subjunctive I
After words with modal meaning (order, suggest, desire, command): I agree that his idea that we go to Alaska in...
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