Monty Python Paper

Only available on StudyMode
  • Topic: Monty Python and the Holy Grail, John Cleese, Monty Python's Flying Circus
  • Pages : 2 (694 words )
  • Download(s) : 74
  • Published : April 22, 2013
Open Document
Text Preview
Dear Dr. Crater,
It is time for that semi-annual rite of academia known as the term paper to flash across the consciousness of the undergraduate population of the region known as the more or less greater Auraria campus in the city of Denver, Colorado. The rite of passage this year will mark the last time I will be presenting my digital scribbling for the perusal and ultimate thumbs up, or the slightly less than thumbs up letter grade. Therefore, in that spirit it is my most grand privilege to be able to report that I have in fact actually learned something that merits credit during this spring term in the year of our Lord 2013. Setting aside all the standard verbiage and rhetoric of whereas and wherefore that traditionally accompanies papers written in what I call “College-see” (a hybrid of formal English that often resembles Chinese) I have learned a vital truth. Specifically, I have learned why John Cleese and Graham Chapman were the writers who caused the universe to stand completely still every Friday night in the 1970s. Ironically, this bold insight, which I shall reveal later, came to me thanks to Salman Rushdie on page 42 of Midnight’s Children. (Quote) Rushdie however, like Lessing, Baldwin, Atwood, and all the British Post-Romanticists, Post-Realists, Post-Modernists, Post-Structuralists and the ad nausea post scripts to earlier British Literature, for all their awards fame and notoriety never once stopped the entire world like the writer’s of Monty Python. In doing my research I have come to fully appreciate and comprehend the very thing that made their television series of the late 1960s and early 1970s “something completely different.” The seriousness of traditional British literature in all its forms is completely surpassed by the endearing and enduring efforts of Cleese and Chapman. Why? At first blush, I was tempted to launch into a vigorous effort to learn why Monty Python is so side splittingly funny. In that vein we could explore...
tracking img