Montessori Directress

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I believe that the main concern for the teacher when it comes to the term “help”

is to guide the child, be like a second parent to that child, when they’re own

parents are not around. The teacher spends more time with the child then

parents can due to busy work schedules and routines. That’s why it’s imperative

for the teacher to take on not only a teacher role, but a second mother like

position. She explains to her student, in an understanding and calm manner. She

is patient when something is done incorrectly. She allows for the child to choose

his own activity, rather than force him into something he has no interest in. When

the child is afraid, she uses her soft voice to ease the child’s fear. When no one

plays with a particular child, it is the teacher’s role to introduce him or her to a

group of child, have them all involved in an activity, and to encourage social

interaction. The teacher plays many parts, not only as an educator. She handles

disputes, without judging. She offers support when a child lacks confidence in

himself. “Never help a child with a task at which he feels he can succeed.” Maria Montessori.

“Free the child's potential, and you will transform him into the world”. Maria Montessori. That’s important

not only for the child but the teacher as well. The teacher’s role is to offer support and

encouragement in order for that individual to have trust in themselves, and confidence.

They have to believe they have the ability to accomplish anything they focus on. “We cannot know the consequences of suppressing a child's spontaneity when he is just beginning to be active.

We may even suffocate life itself. That humanity which is revealed in all its intellectual splendor during the

sweet and tender age of childhood should be respected with a kind of religious veneration. It is like the sun

which appears at dawn or a flower just beginning to bloom. Education cannot be effective unless it helps a

child to open up himself to life.” Maria Montessori.

The teacher is a caretaker of the environment, if she does not respect her surroundings,

the children will not do so. I remember on one particular day at summer camp, a group

of children surrounded a group of snails that were outside. One child decided it would be

funny to crush one of the snails, and did so. I went over as fast as I could, and explained

to the children that we should respect nature, and everything that involves nature

including insects, animals, plants etc. I told them that the snail was carrying his home on

his back, and now he had no place to go. We picked up the snail, which was still alive,

and set him in the corner. The same child that crushed the snail, moments later

apologized, and starting building a home for the snail out of leafs and sticks,his inner self

drove him to correct himself. He didn’t realize that I was watching, nor did he show me

what he did. He didn’t want to show off his accomplishment, but did what he wanted to

do, and walked away, without asking for praise. That made me happy. When is comes to

encouraging the child, the teacher must do so in a way that makes the child content too.

One particular incident comes to mind, when a young boy of two and half had made a

mess with the blocks. The concept of tidying up was foreign to him, so I showed him

where he could put the blocks once he was finished playing with them. The next day, he

helped more. The day after that, he looked at me and said, “I do it!” I realized that was

his way of saying, I can do this on my own now, I don’t need help. I observed him over

the next couple of days, he missed a couple of blocks one day. Another day, put them in

the wrong spot, and put them in a different container the next. But I kept patient, and

didn’t say anything, until he saw other children using the blocks and tidying up. By

watching them, he realized he was...
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