Monitoring Offenders

Only available on StudyMode
  • Topic: House arrest, Crime, Criminal law
  • Pages : 25 (7927 words )
  • Download(s) : 108
  • Published : April 16, 2013
Open Document
Text Preview
Electronic Monitoring1

Electronic Monitoring of Offenders

Electronic Monitoring 2

Abstract

The project discusses different data and sources about electronic monitoring of offenders. The project includes a brief history of how it came about, different literature reviews about the topic, images of devices used to give the audience an idea of how monitoring offenders work, useful websites to look up further information about electronic monitoring of offenders, and some graphs and data of different offenders placed under house arrest and electronically monitored in the community. The main focus of the project is to provide an understanding of how electronic monitoring is used throughout the United States and some other parts of the world. Electronic monitoring is a way of tracking every offenders move and location through a computer via satellite or GPS (Global Positioning System).

Electronic Monitoring3

Table of Contents

Topic “Basics” Section………. Pp. 4-7

Literature Review............... Pp. 8-13

Website References Section……..Pp. 14-18

Data Files……….Pp. 19-21

Topic “Explanation” Section……….Pp.22-25

Appendices………... Pp. 26-27

Electronic Monitoring4

Topic Basics

Electronic monitoring became a very useful way of serving a sentence for criminals. It can be used in many ways: track down the prisoner’s every move, sense to see if the person is drinking alcohol or taking narcotics. The device that is used can be traced back to the agency through via satellite or Global Positioning System (GPS).

Electronic monitoring is important in the criminal justice system because it’s useful technology in monitoring sex offenders and those on probation or parole. I also think it is important that it decreases prison population and less expensive. It costs a lot more money to sentence someone to prison than to sentence someone to house arrest under electronic monitoring. According to Burrell, it costs about ten dollars a day to monitor an offender who is placed under house arrest. When it comes to sex offenders, I think electronic monitoring is important. For example, a sex offender cannot be within a 100 feet of a school and the electronic monitoring can tell the agency if he/she has passed by a school while going to work.

House arrest is when the judge places you on home confinement or detention, he/she orders you to abide by specific terms and conditions that restrict your freedom and mobility. After all, home confinement is still punishment. It's simply more desirable than traditional incarceration. These terms include curfew restrictions, random drug testing, and home visits by a probation or parole officer. Depending on how severe the crime that was committed, the judge may not even allow the offender to attend work or school, travel to medical appointments, or tend to family obligations.

Electronic Monitoring5
Electronic monitoring was developed back in the mid-1960s by a psychologist named Robert Schwitzgebel. It was inspired by the comic book of “Spiderman” (Burrell 2008) when the villain would track down the hero’s every move through a device. It led to the idea that instead of sending misdemeanor offenders to prison but rather incarcerate them in their home. In 1983, the first house arrest with electronic monitoring was sentenced by Judge Jack Love of Albuquerque, New Mexico (Howard 2001). Electronic monitoring became much popularized in the 1980s and was extensively used as an alternative to incarceration in jail or prison. Electronic monitoring is also an adjunct to traditional probation or parole supervision. Today, a couple of decades later, electronic monitoring shows renewed popularity with the interests of legislators (Burrell 2008).

According to Howell (2010), there are two main types of electronic monitoring. One type is continuously signaling, which means...
tracking img