Mongol Influence Dbq

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With incredible tactics, a group of nomadic people specifically referred to as the Mongols, conquered Eurasia during the 13th and 14th centuries and left impacts that apply even to the present. Out of the hundreds of changes they may have caused, there are three that seem the most significant. As they dominated most parts of Eurasia, they brought religious biases, impacts that had negative effect on Eurasia's economy, and influenced the spread of ideas, technology, and diseases.

To a certain extent, religious biases were introduced as the Mongols dominated Eurasia. Although it's not completely certain, the emperor of the Mongols seemed to favor Catholicism as stated in the letter written by Friar John. Genghis Khan did reject the invitation to adopt the Catholic faith with a resonable excuse but praised the Christians. Written for fellow believers, he requests for help in order to change the emperor's mind. Of course, this document is biased because Friar John is from Rome and therefore unexperienced of the effects of Mongol invasions. An extract from the Novogord Chronicles shows the triumph of the common people against the Tartars which is written in favor of the Christians, a religious bias. The believers resisted the pressure from the Mongols and maintained their faith, causing the accursed Tartars to evidently leave the land.

As drastic changes occurred with the arrival of the Mongols, Eurasia's economy slowly began to deteriorate. Minutes before their campaign into China, Genghis Khan lectured his men of his cruel intentions and motivated them to not only steal the enemies' materials but also to put them in misery. Confiscating possessions from an entire nation would surely worsen its economy. His speech is biased in terms of trying to destroy China's economy for his own benefits. Another proof is revealed through a complaint from Rashid Fadl Abi-l'Hair, a Muslim historian, as he spoke of the misdeeds of the Mongols and frowns upon the invention of...
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