Modernization of Ntuc Income Case Study

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 344
  • Published : June 2, 2011
Open Document
Text Preview

Workplace Emotions and Attitudes

Learning Objectives

I Define emotions and identify the two dimensions around which

emotions are organized.
I Diagram the model of emotions, attitudes, and behaviour. I Identify the conditions that require and problems with emotional

I Outline the four components of emotional intelligence. I Summarize the effects of job dissatisfaction in terms of the

exit-voice-loyalty-neglect model.
I Compare the effects of affective and continuance commitment

on employee behaviour.
I Describe five strategies to increase organizational commitment. I Contrast transactional and relational psychological contracts. I Discuss the trend towards employability.


f history is any guide, SaskTel won’t be laying off any employees for a long time. The Regina-based telecommunications company hasn’t laid off anyone since it was founded in 1908. “[Layoffs] aren’t going to happen as long as we can help it,” says Byron Pointer, SaskTel’s vice-president of human resources and industrial relations. By avoiding layoffs, SaskTel is building a more loyal work force. “I have lots of friends who looked for greener grass and moved to Alberta, Toronto or Ottawa,” explains John Hill, a SaskTel electrical engineer who plans and designs information technology systems. “Most have bounced from company to company. Loyalty just doesn’t exist. Here [at SaskTel] you’ve got loyalty.” Along with job security, employees proudly identify with SaskTel because the company applies humanitarian values (fairness, courtesy, moral integrity), keeps staff informed of company developments, and is a model of corporate social responsibility. For instance, SaskTel works with First Nations communities to improve employment opportunities for First Nations youth, provides donations to over 1,500 community organizations, and demonstrates stewardship of the environment. “If you told your mother you’d turned down a job at SaskTel, she’d shoot you,” jokes Jason Durant, who plans and researches new e-business initiatives at SaskTel. SaskTel has built a loyal workforce by avoiding Another driver of employee loyalty is SaskTel’s layoffs, keeping employees informed, providing local and international achievements. SaskTel exciting job opportunities, and demonstrating corwas the first in North America to introduce highporate social responsibility. Courtesy SaskTel speed DSL Internet access. Its international subsidiary, SaskTel International, developed and installed the fibre-optic communications network in the underground channel connecting England and France. The company also provides unique work opportunities for SaskTel staff in Africa and Australia. The result of pride and positive attitudes at SaskTel is a top-notch customer service reputation. “It all starts with the people who do the work,” says Garry Simmons, president of SaskTel International. “Their adaptability and positive attitude allow us to succeed, and we’ve heard so many positive comments from our partners in Tanzania and elsewhere about the quality of our people.”1 I



Individual Behaviour and Processes


askTel and numerous other Canadian firms are paying a lot more attention to employee emotions and attitudes these days. That’s because the emotions people experience and their evaluative judgments about various aspects of work make a difference in the organization’s performance, customer loyalty, and employee well-being. This chapter presents the most up-to-date information available on the topic of workplace emotions and attitudes. We begin by understanding the meaning and types of emotions. We follow this by a close look at how attitudes are formed, and new thinking about how emotions influence both attitudes and behaviour in the workplace. Next, we consider the dynamics of emotional labour, including the conditions requiring and ways of supporting...
tracking img