Modern Indian Painting

Only available on StudyMode
  • Topic: India, Art, Raja Ravi Varma
  • Pages : 8 (2309 words )
  • Download(s) : 410
  • Published : March 25, 2012
Open Document
Text Preview
|MODERN INDIAN PAINTING | | |Nomenclatures are not always irrelevant, for example, the term 'modern'. It may mean many things to many persons. So also the term | | |'contemporary'. Even in the field of the fine arts there is confusion and unnecessary controversy among artists, art historians, and | | |critics. In fact, they all really have the same thing in mind and the arguments hover round terminological implications only. It is not | | |necessary here to indulge in this semantic exercise. Roughly, many consider that the modern period in Indian art began around 1857 or so. | | |This is a historical premise. The National Gallery of Modern Art, New Delhi covers its collection from about this period. In the west, the | | |modern period starts conveniently with the Impressionists. However, when we talk of modern Indian Art, we generally start with the Bengal | | |School of Painting. Both in the matter of precedence and importance, we have to follow the course of art in the order of painting, | | |sculpture, and the graphics, the last being comparatively a very recent development. | | |Broadly speaking, the essential characteristics of the modern or contemporary art are a certain freedom from invention, the acceptance of an| | |eclectic approach which has placed artistic expression in the international perspective as against the regional, a positive elevation of | | |technique which has become both proliferous and supreme, and the emergence of the artist as a distinct individual. | | | | | |  | | | | | | | | | |Painting : 'Lady in The Moon Light' by| | | |Raja Ravi Varma | | | | | | | | | | | |Many people consider modern art as a | | | |forbidding, if not forbidden, | | | |territory. It is not, and no field of | |...
tracking img