Models of Organization Diagnosis

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The primary purpose of this essay is to understand various models of organization diagnosis and their differences also well as their similarities, and also evaluate their strength and weakness. In order to understand these OD models we will need to know what is organizational diagnosis.

What is Organizational Diagnosis?

This is a strategy implemented by organizations to increase its effectiveness. This involves assessing an organization’s existing levels of performance, to design a suitable change that will achieve the expected performance. In organizational diagnosis, diagnostic activities should centre its focus on 2 main areas:

- Subsystem areas (management, group, individual unit)

- Organization processes (decision-making process, communication model, relationships between groups and the setting of goals.

Organizational diagnostician carries out this process of diagnosis considering the whole organization as a total system. They use data form internal and external sources for this purpose. The organizational diagnosticians direct their focus on the activities they think are the vital for the existence of the organization. When performing the diagnosis whole organization is put into focus when drastic changes are needed (French & Bell, 1995).

Lastly in the organizational diagnosis process, all the data collected are communicated back to the organization’s management in order to begin the organizational change phase (Harrison 1987).

Uses of Organizational Diagnosis Models

Organizational diagnosis models help to clearly understand inefficiencies and diversions from organizational goals and targets. Organizational diagnosis models also provide a systematic way together, categorize and understand data. Models identify crucial organizational variables which are theorized to exist according to previous research. Models also reflect the nature of relationship between important variable. Without such models it would be hard to collect and interpret data. Here I will analyse three such organizational diagnosis model,

- Weisbord’s Six Box Model

- Sharp-image Diagnosis model

- The Congruence Model

Weisbord’s Six Box Model

This model of organizational diagnosis consist six elements which are purpose, structure, relationship, rewards, leadership and helpful mechanism. The model focuses on the areas of dissatisfaction as a starting point. The areas of dissatisfactions considered are from the customer point (external), internal point of view (management and employees). The main advantages of this organizational diagnosis model have been its easy to understand and adopt. The model draws from a number of management theory schools -organisation design, behavioural, psychology and organisational learning. Due to its very simplistic approach it has a lack of theoretically basis to determine the actual gaps, degree of change and inefficiencies in an organization. Weisbord’s model also fails to provide the actions needed to close gaps, degree of change and inefficiencies of organization structure.

Harrison and Shirom (1999) says that Weisbord’s model, on identification of gaps, “for each of these elements, consultants has to diagnosis the gaps and degree of changes.

- Gap between what exists now and ought to be

- Gaps between what are actually done and what the mangers say is done.

The Congruence Model

The Congruence model considers data from internal and external of the organization, strategies employed, product and services (output) and how the people of the organization are organised to convert the inputs into outputs. In order to understand the organization system and also how these factors influence in achieving intended results. The Congruence model’s most important element is the concept of fit. Organization success depends on the alignment of each factor (people, work, structure and culture) to one another. The tighter...
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