Mock exam norway 2012

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Task 2 – Short answer

In the extract from the novel Fahrenheit 451 we are acquainted with two characters; Guy Montag, a working fireman, and Clarisse McClellan, his new neighbour. We are only presented a short part of a dialog, although it is possible to understand much of the seemingly futuristic setting the story is set in. Admittedly, I have not read the book, nor have I ever herd about it, but I do feel that I have managed to get a general gist of what the theme is about.

Partway through the extract Clarisse accuses Montag of answering right off and never stopping to think. I think that the accusation is meant in not only the literally context of right then and there in the dialog. The accusation seems to really be about how Montag does not question the apparent censorship of knowledge executed by the government, but doing their bidding as oblivious as before.

The extract from the novel seems to stay on a central topic about the government blocking knowledge by burning books, and making it illegal to read them. This shows the attempted control and manipulation the government is attempting to have on normal citizens. As Ray Bradbury once said: “You don’t have to burn books to destroy a culture. Just get people to stop reading them.” The burning of books has throughout history been associated with the blockage of information, and attempts at erasing the past. From what I can tell, the novels reasoning behind the burnings might very well be one of the two, if not both.

Sources:
http://www.goodreads.com/quotes/tag/reading

Task 3B
Little side note: In the text for 3B it says to write a Personal essay, but at the end it says to give the article a suitable name?

Reading for what?

Reading is one of the first and most fundamental parts of what you learn as a child. It is a skill that is required in order to function adaptably in today’s society. This gives the early stages of school a lot of responsibility. There are multiple views as to how the initial reading exercises should be approached, from both authors and teacher staff. Although everyone really wants the same outcomes, the viewpoints and methods are surprisingly different.

Teachers in the UK seem to reason that quantity exceeds quality for the most part. A prime example of this is how Michael Gove challenges children as young as 11 years old to read 50 books in a year. Authors from throughout the world think that this is absolute bullocks just a terrible way to teach children how to enjoy books. British author Phillip Pullman insists that enjoyment should obviously be the biggest factor in the youths reading program: “We write for them to be enjoyed and add to the joy of life...” Another British author who wholeheartedly disagrees with the “50 book challenge” is Anthony Browne: “Rather than setting an arbitrary number of books that children ought to read, I feel it's the quality of children's reading experiences that really matter."

This leads us to two leading views; the much opposed “read as much as possible and/or analyse what you read method”, and the “enjoyment friendly” method. Without being even slightly biased we can see that the latter seems like the preferable choice. Still, it is the former that is practised the most in schools. It is understandable that schools pick the options that are more academic, and prepares the pupils best for the Sat’s. But frankly, looking at all viewpoints, one method does not need to strike out the other.

I have personally had varied experiences to reading growing up. I grew up in both England and Singapore, but this was at such an early stage, so there was no big emphasis on reading just yet. It quickly came when I moved to Norway, where after a few years of school we were assigned into different reading groups. I remember being slightly jealous of the Harry Potter group, where of course most of my friends were placed. The fact that they got themed candy and generally...
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