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Contents

Page Number

1. Introduction………………………………………………………………….. 2

2. Risk Assessment…………………………………………………………… 3 – 4

3. Respect & Dignity………………………………………………………….. 4 – 5

4. Biomechanics………………………………………………………………. 5 – 6

5. Medical Conditions………………………………………………………… 6 – 7

6. Summary…………………………………………………………………… 7 – 8

7. Bibliography……………………………………………………………….. 9 – 10

Reflective Summary

The following paper is a reflective essay which will examine how during this first module ‘Preparation for Professional Practice’, I have learned the skills needed for safe moving and handling of service users, in accordance with Manual Handling Operations Regulations (MHOR) 1992 (www.hse.gov.uk) and the Health and Safety at Work Act 1974 (www.legislation.gov.uk). I shall be reflecting on these skills, the influences they have had upon me regarding the treatment of future service users, while bearing in mind the effects moving and handling may have on service users with a variety of conditions and how moving and handling can affect such conditions, while also taking care to prevent back injury to myself. I shall also be reflecting upon communication skills used when dealing with service users and how this can put them at ease or in some cases install worry. For the sake of reflection I shall be using the Gibbs Reflective cycle 1988 (Johns, 2009), which will guide me through the six following stages of reflective practice:

1. Description: Situation and circumstance.

2. Feelings: personal thoughts and emotions.

3. Evaluations: reflection on positive and negative outcomes.

4. Analysis: evaluate actions taken.

5. Conclusion: Consider outcome, question and explore result.

6. Action Plan: Subject to lessons learned from points 1-5, maintain or improve practice.

This I shall use in an attempt to critically analyse incidences experienced in practice within the skills lab (Swallow & Chalmers, 2004).

The manual handling lesson was conducted in the skills lab in order to give students the opportunity to gain an incite into the experiences faced by service users which are receiving procedures such as, being moved and handled by nurses, on a daily basis, while also carrying out the duty of performing such care as a practicing student nurse. On opening the lesson in the skills lab, our tutor reminded the group and gave us an opportunity to reflect on a previous lecture we had received on back care. With this in mind I was able to put into practice the knowledge gained from the lecture on back care; as far as positioning yourself correctly when lifting, while also gaining new skills in the moving and handling of service users. Together this reinforced the importance of my posture regarding back care and the need to protect my back in and away from the work place.

We were first taught the importance of a risk assessment and how it is carried out, under the Manual Handling Operations Regulations (MHOR) 1992 (www.hse.gov.uk) and the Health and Safety at Work Act 1974 (www.legislation.gov.uk), which also states that a load should only be lifted if deemed absolutely necessary. Service users are to manoeuvre themselves as much as is physically possible (Dougherty & Lister, 2011, Peate, 2010), reducing the risk of musculoskeletal injuries to the nurse. The nurse must first carryout a risk assessment often referred to as TILE. This includes assessment of the task; how this will be carried out. Individual capabilities; the strength and fitness needed to move the load alone or whether other team members may be needed, e.g. in the event of using a hoist. The load; the service user may be unconscious, connected to medical equipment or are they likely to be resistant or become violent (HSC, 1998). And the environment; allowing adequate space for the procedure.

When assessing risk, it is important to establish the correct number of staff required to perform the task safely. For...
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