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Group 2

Unit 03 Health, safety and security in the health sector.

1.1 Outline how risks to health safety and security can be minimised in an organisation or service. Answer.
Risks can be minimised by following standard procedures within the work place. Machinery, tools or materials- Machinery should be guarded correctly with the appropriate controls fitted ( including emergency stops and interlocks). Routine inspection and effective defect reporting system will also help reduce misuse and minimise risk. Adequate training for all equipment is the best way to ensure your employees are using machinery in the appropriate way. Slips and trips- Ensure floors are in good condition, adequately lit and with designated walkways. Good housekeeping standards and appropriate footwear are also essential to minimise the risks of slips and trips, and documenting a cleaning programme for any spillages will also be a benefit. Struck by object/person- It is important to identify the potential sources and causes of incidents and introduce appropriate control measures, which may include traffic control, good housekeeping and effective machinery guarding. Gas and electrical- Ensuring that all systems are installed by suitably qualified contractors ( preferably NICEIC approved or a member of the gas safe register) plus regular inspection and testing will minimise the risks of electrical or gas fires. Establishing controls on the use of portable appliances is also important and sometimes an insurance requirement. Security and theft- You can improve the physical security of your organisation or service by installing electronic security systems such as cctv, intruder alarms and security lights. Improving perimeter security installing barriers, screens, using security personnel and contractors will also minimise risks of security breaches and theft.

1.2 Identify the key legislation that relates to health, safety and security. Answer.
Key legislation means a law or set of laws created by a government their put in place so these policies and procedures are followed as intended. The health and safety at work etc. act 1974
The provision and use of work equipment regulations act 1998 The reporting of injuries, diseases and dangerous occurrences act 1995 The manual handling operations act 1992
Construction (Head Protection) Regulations 1989
Construction (Health, Safety and Welfare) Regulations 1996
Control of Asbestos Regulations 2006
Control of Lead at Work Regulations 1998
Control of Major Accident Hazards Regulations 1999 (COMAH)
Control of Noise at Work. Regulations 2005

Control of Substances Hazardous to Health Regulations 2002 (COSHH) Dangerous Substances (Notification and Marking of Sites) Regulations 1990 Dangerous Substances and Explosive Atmosphere Regulations 2002 (DSEAR) Electricity at Work Regulations 1989 (SI 1989 No. 635)

Food Hygiene (England) Regulations 2006
Food Premises (Registration) Regulations 1991
Food Safety (General Food Hygiene) Regulations 1995
Gas Appliances (Safety) Regulations 1992
Gas Safety (Management) Regulations 1996
Hazardous Waste (England and Wales) Regulations 2005
Health and Safety at Work Act 1974
Health and Safety (First Aid) Regulations 1981
Health and Safety (Consultation with Employees) Regulations 1996 Health and Safety (Display Screen Equipment) Regulations 1992 Health and Safety (Information for Employees) Regulations 1989 Health and Safety (Safety Signs and Signals) Regulations 1996 Health and Safety (Young Persons) Regulations 1997

Highly Flammable Liquids and Liquefied Petroleum Gases Regulations 1972 Ionising Radiations Regulations 1999

1.3 Identify how an organisations policies and procedures support key legislation. Answer.
The health and safety at work act (1974) is the legislation (or law) which applies to every work place, it can basically be boiled down to 2 statements. Employees responsibility: To ensure so far as is reasonably...
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