Mis in Operations with Example

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Assignment ' 2 Prepared by: Rahul Bangur SMBA08172 Section - C Is MIS Applicable in Management?

By the end of the first year of your MBA program, you would finish all the core courses, allowing you to appreciate the various management areas, particularly Operations Marketing Finance Human Resources You may also ask yourself how MIS fits as a management subject. This assignment will help you relate MIS to the management area of your choice.

You are required to provide a practical example of how MIS can be deployed in one of the four specialization areas listed above. The report should include two integrated components:

I. A discussion of why and how MIS is suitable for the specialization area; identify how widely (or otherwise) MIS is actually used in the area, and what can be done to further promote its use (if needed).

II. The above discussion should be accompanied with an example of a real-world company/industry that deploys MIS in the specialization of interest. Introduction You have to consider three managerial factors together in MIS: effectiveness, efficiency and profitability. oEffectiveness ' How well a firm is pursuing a goal or objective of its business; for instance, providing quality product/service can be a business goal that is usually stated in a firm's mission statement; Management by objective (MBO), etc. Therefore, it is necessary to drastically improve operations in the functional areas, increasing productivity, quality, speed, and customer service. Therefore, I am explaining the use of MIS in Operation Management Operations management focuses on carefully managing the processes to produce and distribute products and services. Usually, small businesses don't talk about "operations management", but they carry out the activities that management schools typically associate with the phrase "operations management." Major, overall activities often include product creation, development, production and distribution. (These activities are also associated with operation and product management. However product management is usually in regard to one or more closely related product -- that is, a product line. Operations management is in regard to all operations within the organization.) Related activities include managing purchases, inventory control, quality control, storage, logistics and evaluations. A great deal of focus is on efficiency and effectiveness of processes. Therefore, operations management often includes substantial measurement and analysis of internal processes. Ultimately, the nature of how operations management is carried out in an organization depends very much on the nature of products or services in the organization, for example, retail, manufacturing, wholesale, etc. Control and Coordinating Function of Management Product and Service Management

Quality Management
Inventory Management
Logistics and Transportation Management
Facilities Management
Configuration Management
Distribution Channels {text:bookmark-start} {text:bookmark-end} Management Control and Coordinating Function Management control and coordination includes a broad range of activities to ensure that organizational goals are consistently being met in an effective and efficient fashion. Many People Are Averse to Management "Control" New, more "organic" forms or organizations allow organizations to be more responsive and adaptable in today's rapidly changing world. These forms also cultivate empowerment among employees, much more than the hierarchical, rigidly structured organizations of the past.. "Coordination" Must Exist or There's No Organization -- Only an "Experience" Regardless of the negative connotation of the word "control", it must exist or there is no organization at all. In its most basic form, an organization is two or more people working together to reach a goal. Whether an organization is highly bureaucratic or changing and self-organizing, the...
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