Mini-Bus Industry in Egypt

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Business Economics
MBA 2010
Mini-Bus Market Competition

Table of Contents
1. Introduction…………………………………………………………..3 2. Market Major Players………………………………………………..7 3. Market Segmentation……………………………………………….8 4. Factors Affecting Demand…………………………………………10 5. Factors Affecting Supply…………………………………………...11 6. Market Shares………………………………………………………15 7. Demand and Supply………………………………………………..16 8. Market Equilibrium…………………………………………………..17 9. Price Elasticity……………………………………………………….22 10. References…………………………………………………………...27

1. Introduction
Minibus
A minibus or minicoach is a passenger carrying motor vehicle that is designed to carry more people than a multi-purpose vehicle or minivan, but fewer people than a full-size bus. In the United Kingdom, the word "minibus" is used to describe any full-sized passenger carrying van. Minibuses have a seating capacity of between 8 and 30 seats. Larger minibuses may be called minibuses. Minibuses are typically front-engine step-entrance vehicles, although low floor minibuses do exist.

Usage
Minibuses are used for a variety of reasons. In a public transport role, they can be used as fixed route transit buses, airport buses, flexible demand responsive transport vehicles, share taxis or large taxicabs. Accessible minibuses can also be used for par transit type services, by local authorities, transit operators, hospitals or charities. Private uses of minibuses can include corporate transport, charter buses, and tour buses. Schools, sports clubs, community groups and charities may also use minibuses for private transport. Individual owners may use reduced seating minibuses as cheap recreational vehicles. Types

By size, microbuses are minibuses smaller than 8 meters (26 ft 3 in) long. Minibuses are minibuses bigger than microbuses but smaller than plenitudes (full-size buses).T

There are many different types and configurations of minibuses, due to historical and local differences, and usage. Minibus designs can be classified in three main groups, with a general increase in seating capacity with each type: * Van conversions. Simple, optional extras

* Body builds
* Purpose built

Van conversions

The most basic source of minibus is the van conversion, where the minibus is derived by modifying an existing van design. Conversions may be produced completely by the van manufacturer, sold as part of their standard model line-up, or be produced by specialist conversion companies, who source a suitably prepared base model from the van manufacturer for final completion as a minibus. Van conversions involve adding windows to the bodywork, and seating to the cargo area. Van conversion minibuses outwardly look the same shape as the parent van, and the driver and front passenger cabin remains unchanged, retaining the driver and passenger doors. Access to the former cargo area for passengers is through the standard van side sliding door, or the rear doors. These may be fitted with step equipment to make boarding easier. Optional extras to van converted minibuses can include the addition of a roll sign for transit work, and/or a full height walk-in door, for passenger access to the former cargo area. For public transport use, this door may be an automatic concertina type. For other uses, this may be a simple plug style coach door. Depending on the relevant legislation, conversions may also involve wheelchair lifts and macrograph equipment

Body builds

Another method of building a minibus is for a second stage manufacturer to build a specific body for fitting to a semi-completed van or light truck chassis. These allow a higher seating capacity than a simple van conversion. Often, the second stage manufacturer is a bus manufacturer. In a body-on-chassis minibus, a cabin body is installed on a van or light truck chassis encompassing the driver’s area. These designs may retain some outward signs of the original van, such as the hood and grill....
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