Mind and Victor

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While Victor created Frankenstein, he gave him a functioning mind capable of thinking

storing thoughts. Psychoanalysis includes several theories involving the functioning mind. Analysis

of this function involves clarifying the patient's pathological wishes, defenses, and guilt. By

analyzing conflicts psychoanalytic treatment can clairify how patients unconsciously are their own

worst enemies. By analyzing Frankenstein's compulsive thoughts and actions, the reader can

better understand Frankenstein's personality.

Victor's life is ruled by science and what other people think of him until he creates

Frankenstein. Once Frankenstein was created, Victor had an outlet for his compulsive wishes and

actions. From the minute Frankenstein was first created, Victor is scared that he created a

monstor and a duplicate of himself. The author, Mary Shelley, illustrates the consequences of the

fulfillment of one's dreams beside the obvious ones. "Natural philosophy is the genius that has

regulated my fate; I desire, therefore, in this narration, to state those facts which led to my

predilection for that science" (Frankenstein, Shelley).

Victor has a fetish for the grotesque. He has no proclivities about death. When he begins

to create Frankenstein, he does not realize the consequences of making a monster. When

Frankenstein first awakens and sees for the first time, Victor sees for the first time, and he

becomes frightened at what he has created. "I doubted at first whether I should attempt the

creation of a being like myself, or one of simplier organization; but my imagination was too much

exalted by my first success to permit me to doubt of the ability to give life to an animal as complex

and wonderful as man" (Frankenstein, Shelley). Victor's evil work is the symbol of repressed

desire. Because Victor's desire in creating Frankenstein is unknown, he looks for it in

Frankenstein, and Victor's desire becomes Frankenstein's desire. Victor wants Frankenstein to

Palmer 2

depend on him, and he wants to top fatherhood, so Frankenstein will worship him as his father. "A

new species would bless me as its creator and source; many happy and excellent natures would

owe their being to me. No father could claim the gratitude of his child so completely as I should

deserve theirs" (Frankenstein, Shelley).

When Frankenstein is "born", Victor develops a mother-child relationship with

Frankenstein. Victor's desire is to be the recipient of love; as the fulfiller of another's desires.

According to Jacques Lacan, this desire for the mother to be a recipient of love and the fulfiller of

another's desires is repressed by the father negating authority when the child is still an infant. This

repression forms the unconscious, which the ego works to maintain (Lacan, Ecritis).

Frankenstein operates from his ego many times throughout the novel. "I imagined that

they would be disgusted, until, by my gentle demeanour and conciliating words, I should first win

their favour and afterwards their love" (Frankenstein, Shelley). Frankenstein believes he can

control his signifiers, so he naturally believes that his ability to talk and think will make up for his

appearance. He uses his social skills and intelligence to integrate himself with the cottage-

dwellers. Because of this, Frankenstein cannot present himself as whole, because he is torn from

Victor's paternal negation of his origional desire from when Frankenstein was first created. Now,

Frankenstein must rely on his own skills that Victor gave him to integreat into a community.

Frankenstein begins to read and learn how to speak, because he believes if he can speak it will

prevent the community members from seeing his hideous exterior. Frankenstein's hopes of using

speech to integrate into the community are crashed when a group of...
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