Mina Loy and Futurism

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Mina Loy and Futurism
Mina Loy, a futurist and modernist poet, uses graphic and uncensored depictions to portray art as a violent force. I believe from the excerpt of poems read in class from Loy’s book The Lost Lunar Baedeker, she conceptualizes art in her poems through futuristic themes of speed, violence, rejection of the past, and urban scenes. Her poems are an insight into the modernist movement and a revolt against traditional views that embrace a new prospective on the importance of art during the movement. Loy depicts speed in her poems “Brancusi’s Golden Bird.” “Oh Hell” embraces violence, the future, and rejection of the past. “Apology of Genius” describes urban scenes and the coming of the future. Futuristic images come alive in “Mexican Desert.” In all of her poems, Loy admires the future and futuristic ideals with no desire for the past. Loy’s poem “Brancusi’s Golden Bird” is an extraordinarily powerful poem. The poem describes a piece of art viewed by Loy as sinless treating the sculpture as a higher power. This particular poem of Loy’s, aligns close with the speaker’s [Loy’s] thoughts. Loy is giving her direct thoughts on her perspective and interpretation of Brancusi’s “Golden Bird” sculpture. The reader feels as though they are in her head as she is examining the sculpture. In describing Brancusi’s “Golden Bird” sculpture, Loy uses the futuristic ideals of speed and machines to depict the very fast and perhaps violent bird. In the opening line, Loy states “The toy become the aesthetic archetype,” (79). Loy uses imagism to depict the bird as an abstract work of art that is very modern for the era. She depicts the bird as a toy with a futuristic “aesthetic archetype.” Due to its rare architecture, the form of the bird can be related to the glorification of machines for futurist. Loy imagines the bird as being very fast and employs the futuristic ideal of speed when she states, “the immaculate conception of the inaudible bird” (80). The bird has...
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