Mildred's and Montags Room

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In the novel Fahrenheit 451 Bradbury uses many literary devices. He ranges from imagery, diction, connotation, syntax, metaphors, and similes. Bradbury uses these several literary devices in order to show sadness and in a way build suspense. Throughout Fahrenheit 451 his usage is shown in a wide variety of ways.

An example of imagery is “It was like coming into the cold marbled room of a mausoleum after the moon has set. (Bradbury 10)” Bradbury uses this statement to show us as the reader that he wants us to feel or create an image of Montag walking into a room that pretty much lifeless and dark. The author uses this feeling and imagery because in the novel the characters portray humans that can not think for themselves so therefore it seems as if they are almost dead. “Complete darkness, not a hint of the silver world outside the window tightly shut […]. (10)” Once again Bradbury tries to enforce the picture or his mode about Montag and Mildred’s bedroom, how dark and lifeless it is.

Bradbury also uses diction, word choice and connotation which stands for an idea that has been implied or suggested. “He was not happy. HE was not happy, (11)” shows diction and connotation. It’s diction because not happy is Bradbury’s word choice. It’s connotation because as a reader we can imply that Montag the characters are not happy. The way Bradbury uses diction and connotation in the passage to help reinforce the point that Montag feels unhappy with his life.

The syntactical strategy that Bradbury uses is used because he is setting the scene with dark and cold feeling. Through syntax Bradbury builds his suspense. Bradbury also uses similes and metaphors in this novel to add more insight to how the character in the story feels. “He wore his happiness like a mask and the girl had run off across the lawn with the mask and there was no way of going to knock on her door and ask for it back. (12),” this example of a simile that Bradbury picks relates to how each person...
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