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History of Discovery: In 1864 James Clerk Maxwell predicted the existence of electromagnetic waves/microwaves. Then in 1888 Heinrich Hertz was the first to demonstrate the existence of microwaves by building an apparatus that detected and produced microwaves in the UHF region. Also in 1894 J. C. Bose publicly demonstrated radio control of a bell using millimeter wavelengths, and conducted research into the propagation of microwaves.

Origin(s): One origin of microwaves include a maser, which is similar to a laser but it runs on microwaves.

Wavelength and Frequency Range: The range for microwaves include super-high frequency (SHF) (3-30 Ghz), ultra-high frequency (UHF) (0.3-3 Ghz), and extremely-high frequency (EHF) (30-300 Ghz) signals. The wavelength for a microwave ranges from 1mm-1m.

Where in the Spectrum the Waves are Located: Towards the start of the electromagnetic spectrum, behind radio where the wavelengths are longer.

Uses: Microwaves are mostly used in communication. For example, Cable T.V., Internet, and some mobile phone networks such as GMS use the lower microwave frequencies. Another example is Satellite communication such as satellite T.V., Direct Broadcast Satellite, and Military communications. Some more examples of uses for microwaves are Microwave Radio used in broadcasting and telecommunication and the Bluetooth.

Devices Using These Waves: One device that uses microwaves is radar. The radar uses microwave radiation to detect characteristics, range, speed of remote objects.

Dangers That Have Been Reported: When injury from microwaves occur it usually results from insulated or stopped heating in the body. Exposure to microwave radiation can produce cataracts or clouding in the eye that destroys the passage of light and varies from slight to complete opacity. So exposure to microwave radiation can cause gradual blindness.

One Scientist Associated With the Wave: Heinrich Hertz was the first to demonstrate that...
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