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The Future of Textbooks
Education is one of the most important parts of a person’s life, so why would we not do everything in our power to make it as useful as possible. America is constantly updating the technology of cars, computers, and most everything else; that is, besides education. The American education system is years behind the leading countries such as China and Finland. The top ranked countries simply focus more on education. That means more hours, more homework, and stricter teachers. America’s school hours are decreasing, and have always been liberal as far as strictness goes. To rise up the rankings, we need a way to educate students more efficiently. Electronic textbooks are the way to do this. America has always been leading in technology, and there have been recent breakthroughs that would bring textbooks to the tablet. Educators and textbook companies are pushing to improve the way textbooks teach. Making them electronic allows for so many more opportunities and ways to learn. Moving to an electronic education will make educating more efficient, save the environment, students and teachers backs, and dramatically increase the amount of money spent on books. Improving textbooks will be able to make educating far more efficient. Teachers have been using the same techniques in the classroom for decades. Lectures and assignments force information on students, but it depends on the type of student if they actually retain that information. Technology in a classroom environment allows every type of student to learn and review the material in an interactive way. The Internet allows course instructors to do much more than they could ever do in the classroom alone. Teachers are only instructing the students directly for an hour a day; the rest of the time is the student’s responsibility to know the material. We are far too advanced to still be using paper books to educate. Since the late nineties, “educators and publishers understood that the...
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